Indigenous Arts

November 14, 2011 by admin
Oral histories tell of a time when there were villages on Alcatraz Island, only, at the time, it was not an island but was instead a hill that overlooked the great river flowing to the sea. Read More...
November 16, 2010 by Abigail
2010, 44 pages, Ford Foundation, 320 E 43d St, New York, NY, 10017, 212-573-5000   www.fordfoundation.org Read More...
March 23, 2010 by Abigail
2009, 328 pages, ISBN 978-0295989358. University of Washington Press, PO Box 50096, Seattle, WA, 98145, 800-537-5487, www.washington.edu/uwpress Read More...
January 21, 2010 by admin
2009, 128 pages. Arts Economy Initiative, Project on Regional and Industrial Economics, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, and the University of Minnesota. Read More...
November 22, 2009 by Steve
Originally commissioned for publication in Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: An Anthology of the American Indian Holocaust, this essay is dedicated to the women. Their voices should not be lost, their lives erased because we do not want to know the horrible truth of our shared history. — P. Kingfisher Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
Based on a series of talking circles of tribal leaders and funders, this handsome report reviews the history of Native peoples and the role of art in tribal culture, examines program priorities of funders, and identifies strategies for supporting Native arts and artists. The extensive bibliography is also a valuable tool for Grantmakers. Download PDF from The Potlatch Fund. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
Native America at the new Millennium is a Ford Foundation-funded collaboration by the Harvard Project, Native Nations Institute, and First Nations Development Institute that serves as a primer on contemporary American Indian affairs. NANM addresses topics as wide-ranging as tribal government, non-profit organizations, political activism, economic development, housing, welfare, health, arts, and media. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
More than 100 sources were interviewed, consulted, or literature reviewed for information for this study on Native American Philanthropy. "Native communities have always practiced various forms of giving, from rituals and religious ceremonies to auctions and art fairs." Read on as this study explains how Native American communities have always been involved with, and are increasing their visibility in philanthropy. Download pdf from Native Americans in Philanthropy. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
First Nations Development Institute and Native Americans in Philanthropy convened a group of Native philanthropic leaders in Minneapolis/St. Paul on September 14 2005, to discuss how we can better support the development of Native foundations and Native philanthropy. The objective of this meeting was to provide insight and input into the design and implementation of a structure to support the further development of Native foundations and Native philanthropy through technical assistance, advocacy and research. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
A Native critique of American life, featuring the best of Indian Country Today's editorials and perspectives since 2000. Contemporary Native thinkers and writers meet the dominant issues in both Indian and non-Indian public life head-on in this unique publication. The book is a must-read for anyone who needs a contemporary view of the major issues affecting tribal communities across the country. Available from Indian Country Today. Read More...