Indigenous Arts

October 1, 2012 by admin

Since the Ford Foundation’s institutional stabilization programs of the 1960s, arts funders have explored and implemented initiatives intended to promote the sustainability of arts organizations. Funding approaches, programs, and special terminology have been developed in support of the arts’ economic and social contributions to society. Artists and arts organizations are evaluated on the basis of their fiscal prudence and community contributions as well as artistic merit.

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November 15, 2011 by admin

Several years ago I attended a meeting of California Indians at the University of California at Irvine. They had come together to discuss tribal sovereignty, but the campus parking regulations quickly shanghaied the conversation. We had been issued parking permits with totally incomprehensible rules, regulations, and instructions. Only one element of clarity stood out: “Improperly parked vehicles will be impounded.” For a half hour some of the best minds in Indian country were tied up trying to figure out where to park, until L.

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November 14, 2011 by admin
Oral histories tell of a time when there were villages on Alcatraz Island, only, at the time, it was not an island but was instead a hill that overlooked the great river flowing to the sea.
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November 16, 2010 by Abigail

2010, 44 pages, Ford Foundation, 320 E 43d St, New York, NY, 10017, 212-573-5000   www.fordfoundation.org

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March 23, 2010 by Abigail

2009, 328 pages, ISBN 978-0295989358. University of Washington Press, PO Box 50096, Seattle, WA, 98145, 800-537-5487, www.washington.edu/uwpress

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January 21, 2010 by admin

2009, 128 pages. Arts Economy Initiative, Project on Regional and Industrial Economics, Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, and the University of Minnesota.

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November 22, 2009 by Steve
Originally commissioned for publication in Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: An Anthology of the American Indian Holocaust, this essay is dedicated to the women. Their voices should not be lost, their lives erased because we do not want to know the horrible truth of our shared history.
— P. Kingfisher
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November 12, 2009 by Steve

Based on a series of talking circles of tribal leaders and funders, this handsome report reviews the history of Native peoples and the role of art in tribal culture, examines program priorities of funders, and identifies strategies for supporting Native arts and artists. The extensive bibliography is also a valuable tool for Grantmakers.

Download PDF from The Potlatch Fund.

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November 12, 2009 by Steve

Native America at the new Millennium is a Ford Foundation-funded collaboration by the Harvard Project, Native Nations Institute, and First Nations Development Institute that serves as a primer on contemporary American Indian affairs. NANM addresses topics as wide-ranging as tribal government, non-profit organizations, political activism, economic development, housing, welfare, health, arts, and media.

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November 12, 2009 by Steve

More than 100 sources were interviewed, consulted, or literature reviewed for information for this study on Native American Philanthropy.

"Native communities have always practiced various forms of giving, from rituals and religious ceremonies to auctions and art fairs." Read on as this study explains how Native American communities have always been involved with, and are increasing their visibility in philanthropy.

Download pdf from Native Americans in Philanthropy.

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