Philanthropic practice

October 31, 2003 by admin

One of the fastest growing affinity groups in philanthropy, the Association of Small Foundations serves trustees, staff, and consultants working with "foundations with few or no staff." Most of its members have assets of $50 million or less, and many of them depend on consulting groups to manage investments and assist with grantmaking. These consultants were well-represented at the conference as speakers, exhibitors, and general participants. As of August 2002, the Association had 2,801 members with assets totaling $47.8 billion.

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October 31, 2003 by admin

Cultural Diplomacy Initiative

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October 31, 2003 by admin

A labor of love for individuals committed to the significance and potential of media, Why FUND Media is a timely and worthy follow-up to a 1984 publication by the Council on Foundations titled How to Fund Media. Editor Karen Hirsch seamlessly brings together a series of separate chapters written by media arts experts who've based their chapter essays on extensive consultations with field representatives and grantmakers, and on historical research.

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September 1, 2003 by admin

January 2003, 46 pages. The Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, NW, Washington DC 20037, 202-833-7200, 202-429-0687 (fax), www.urban.org/publications/310616.html.

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September 1, 2003 by admin

2003, 53 pages. Blueprint Research and Design, 415-677-9700 or 206-324-4999, www.blueprintrd.com; Social Venture Partners Seattle, 206-374-8757, www.svpseattle.org. Report available at www.svpseattle.org

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   Transforming Philanthropic Transactions (733Kb)

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September 1, 2003 by admin

2003, 52 pages. Fund for Folk Culture, P.O. Box 1566, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1566, 505-984-2534, www.folkculture.org; Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington DC 20037, 202-833-7200, www.urban.org.

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August 26, 2003 by admin
What follows are excerpts from a lecture that W. McNeil Lowry gave at Brandeis University on December 10, 1962 when he was director of the Ford Foundation's Program in the Humanities and the Arts. GIA member Ben Cameron called the speech to our attention, noting that it continues to have relevance today. The date, 1962, is important to keep in mind when reading Lowry's talk: the National Council on Community Foundations was renamed the Council on Foundations in 1964; the National Endowment for the Arts was established in 1965.
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July 31, 2003 by admin

At the GIA conference in fall, 2002, we hosted a round table discussion with the euphemistic title "Adapting in a Time of Constraints." Essentially its burden was to ask: what should we, as funders, be doing for the cultural institutions with whom we work in the context of these extraordinarily difficult times?

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July 31, 2003 by admin

Editors of the Reader invited GIA's research advisors to reflect on challenges facing arts grantmakers in light of current research findings on arts funding trends.

What do recent research findings suggest about the prospect for the support of arts and culture in the years ahead?

Ed Pauly: After a decade of dramatic growth in foundations' support for the arts, the funding news is now somber. Yet the meaning we make from the most recent study of foundation funding for the arts depends, as always, on the perspective we choose.

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July 31, 2003 by admin

Recently, several studies of arts funding have been conducted in specific cities and regions. We report on a few of these here. In the winter 2002 issue of the GIA Reader Vol. 13, No. 1, Lisa Cremin and Kathie de Nobriga reported on a comparative study of arts funding in Atlanta and nineteen other cities. The report was both an inspiring and a cautionary tale for Ann McQueen and others in Boston as they planned the study that Cindy Gehrig reviews below.

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