Capitalization

Grantmakers in the Arts defines capitalization as “the accumulation of the resources an organization needs to fulfill its mission over time,” specifically with regard to financial health. In response to the observation that it has been the norm for the nonprofit arts sector to be poorly capitalized, an issue which disproportionately affects ALAANA organizations, GIA embarked on the National Capitalization Project (NCP) in 2010. Since its launch, GIA has provided resources, conferences sessions, publications, and workshops on nonprofit capitalization. GIA’s Conversations on Capitalization and Community are specialized workshops, held separately for funders and nonprofit grantees, focusing on what each group can do to support the financial health of nonprofit arts and culture organizations. These workshops are available upon request.

January 13, 2016 by admin
January 2016, 19 pages. The James Irvine Foundation, One Bush Street, Suite 800, San Francisco, California, 94104. www.irvine.org. Read More...
October 15, 2015 by admin
In 2008, ten performing arts organizations embarked on an experiment in capitalization. As participants in Nonprofit Finance Fund’s Leading for the Future (LFF) Initiative, the first program to introduce change capital on a national scale, they set out to develop new program models and operating structures that would respond to shifts in the artistic environment and serve as instructive examples to the field. Read More...
October 15, 2015 by admin
The mission of the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, established in 2002, is to enhance the quality of life of Oregonians through support of the arts and education. In the midst of the 2009 recession, the foundation began a six-year grantmaking initiative that provided general operating support to Portland’s five large arts organizations. The foundation made important shifts in its grantmaking strategy to help shore up the financial strength and stability of the Portland Opera, Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland Center Stage, Portland Art Museum, and the Oregon Symphony. Read More...
October 15, 2015 by admin
Extensive research has demonstrated what those close to the arts, culture, and humanities sector already know: the health of the sector is intertwined with the health of our communities. In addition to cultural enrichment, arts, culture, and humanities nonprofits create jobs, support economic growth, and contribute to community revitalization. Read More...
July 9, 2015 by admin
In the wake of the worst global economic recession in living memory, the creative industries sector has emerged as a powerful engine for economic growth and social, environmental, and cultural sustainability. With growing concern over the staggering amounts of funding now being directed toward social impact initiatives globally and the effectiveness of those investments, perhaps the time has come for gatekeepers to consider adding the creative industries to the short list of investment-worthy target sectors. Read More...
April 14, 2015 by Steve

Cathy Hunt, writing for The Australian Financial Review:

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March 26, 2015 by admin
Capitalization has been a hot topic in the arts funding community — and in these very pages — in recent years. Funders and cultural organizations alike are increasingly invested in the capital structures that undergird a vibrant cultural sector. Driven by a shared desire to increase artistic vitality in the Greater Boston area, two GIA members — the Barr Foundation and The Klarman Family Foundation — are taking a closer look at how capitalization supports their grantees’ ability to both take and manage risk. Read More...
March 19, 2015 by Steve

Rebecca Thomas finishes her six myths piece for Associated Grant Makers:

In my last piece for In Philanthrophy, I offered three recommendations for how grantmakers can overcome commonly held misconceptions about the role of money in strengthening nonprofit effectiveness. I encouraged funders to: support comprehensive capitalization planning, reward financial management practices that promote surpluses and savings, and consider seeding cash reserves as a source of funds for handling and taking risk. Here, I share three additional myths that get in the way of healthy nonprofit finances and suggest funder practices that, in my experience, create an environment more supportive of organizational success.
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March 10, 2015 by Steve

From Rebecca Thomas, writing for Associated Grant Makers:

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February 6, 2015 by Steve

In 2009, TDC published Getting Beyond Breakeven, a study commissioned by the William Penn Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts, which reviewed the capitalization needs and challenges of arts and culture organizations in Philadelphia. This study, also commissioned by the William Penn Foundation, is divided into two major sections.

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