Racial Equity

Grantmakers in the Arts is committed to addressing structural inequities and increasing philanthropic and government support for African, Latino/a, Asian, Arab, and Native American (ALAANA) artists and arts organizations. Racial equity is a lens through which GIA aims to conduct all of its work, as well as a specific area of its programming. Since 2008, GIA has been elevating racial equity as a critical issue affecting the field. To actualize this work within the sector, GIA published its Racial Equity in Arts Philanthropy Statement of Purpose in 2015. Through webinars, articles, convenings, and conference sessions, GIA provides training and information to support arts funders in addressing historic and structural inequity.

An historical outline of GIA's recent work in equity is available online, including GIA Reader articles, blog posts, and YouTube videos from past conference keynote sessions.

July 5, 2016 by admin
Over the past five years, Theatre Communications Group (TCG) has taken an active and vocal position on the need for a more equitable, diverse, and inclusive theatre field. We have been approaching this challenge on multiple fronts, and our thinking has evolved dramatically over time as we learn more about equity, ourselves, our history, and the deeply embedded structures of racism and other forms of oppression in our theatre field and larger society. Read More...
July 5, 2016 by admin
Understanding and embracing transformational change are ubiquitous in cultural policy circles. Research on dramatic demographic shifts, seismic alterations in technology and audience consumption, and postrecession political realities compel arts leaders to master not only their genre but the sticky notion of change itself. Grantmakers in the Arts' own equity work, EmcArts Community Innovation Labs, and ArtPlace’s placemaking practices are all attempts to recalibrate the arts funding ecosystem to respond and adapt to change. Read More...
April 12, 2016 by Monica

The fifth and final State of the Work report has been released by the D5 Coalition. The coalition is a five-year collaboration of foundations, donors, associations, and organizations with an aim to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy. The final State of the Work report focuses on “stories of people in foundations who have taken action to advance [diversity, equity, and inclusion].” A separate forthcoming report will reflect on sector progress over the past five years of the coalition's work.

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April 7, 2016 by Monica

In an article posted in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Phillip Henderson of Surdna Foundation and Rip Rapson of The Kresge Foundation discuss how some of their programs have helped to address economic and racial inequities.

For a nation whose majority population will soon be people of color, [economic] inequities loom large over the future prosperity of cities and their surrounding metropolitan regions — and pose a major challenge for philanthropy to tackle.
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March 4, 2016 by admin
On June 2, 2015, Alternate ROOTS Executive Director, Carlton Turner, presented the following as a keynote address at the Grantmakers in the Arts Racial Equity Forum in Atlanta, Georgia. Introduction: Georgia Men “Black people did not come back from Georgia.” “A man or woman that had learned that they might be taken south might do anything.” “A man who had to see his son stand naked before buyers might do anything.” Read More...
March 3, 2016 by admin
Art is not magic; most artists are not all that different from other people. However, many of them developed a skill or asset that most of us haven’t: a fascination for the undercurrent in our society, in our social encounters, in our practices, in our organizations.  —  Jaap Warmenhoven, Stanford Social Innovation Review Read More...
March 3, 2016 by admin
Grantmakers in the Arts is committed to promoting racial equity in arts philanthropy and increasing support for Asian, Latino/a, African, Arab, and Native American (ALAANA) artists, arts organizations, and communities. Our statement of purpose for this work, published in March 2015, comes after five years of internal discussions, workshops, articles, and forums led by a small learning group consisting of social justice funders and those concerned with social justice. Read More...
February 11, 2016 by Steve

Eleanor Savage, of the Jerome Foundation, penned this article in October 2015 for the Arts in a Changing America website:

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January 25, 2016 by Steve

The National Center for Arts Research (NCAR) at Southern Methodist University has released a white paper titled “Does ‘Strong and Effective’ Look Different for Culturally Specific Organizations?” that examines the distinguishing characteristics of arts organizations that primarily serve Asian-American, African-American, and Hispanic/Latino communities. The study is intended to provide insights, based on measurable data, about the operating contexts and unique challenges that these organizations face.

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