REGISTER FOR THE 2017 GIA CONFERENCE IN DETROIT
Registration is now open for the 2017 GIA Conference taking place Saturday, October 28 – Tuesday, October 31 in Detroit, MI. The GIA Conference provides the only national opportunity for arts grantmakers from across the country to come together to share knowledge and ideas, develop collective strategies, and learn about the latest initiatives in arts grantmaking. Learn more and register.
Posted on July 25, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Amy Stolls of the NEA introduces The Literary Network, or LitNet, a newly reimagined national coalition of nonprofit literary organizations aiming to support the literary field’s unique needs and challenges. Read “A New Literature Network.”

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Monica

From Artnet News:

As major publications from The New York Times to the Wall Street Journal cut back on arts coverage, one little-known foundation is stepping up to help fund it.

The Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation made a splash in the world of art criticism and journalism this week, announcing a new annual prize that offers American art writers who write for general audiences (rather than academic readers) a $50,000 unrestricted grant in recognition of their work. The grant matches the highest awards given by the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation, which range from $15,000 to $50,000, and is five times the sum awarded to Pulitzer Prize winners.

Read the full article on Artnet News.

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Monica

GIA board member Jaime Dempsey has been honored with the 2017 Emerging Leader Award from the Center for the Future of Arizona in recognition of her work as a public servant. Dempsey will become the executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts in August 2017 after serving eleven years as deputy director.

Read the announcement.

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Monica

The Vermont Arts Council has announced that Karen S. Mittelman, PhD, has accepted the position of executive director for the state arts agency. Mittelman is currently director of the Division of Public Programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in Washington, DC. She brings to the Vermont Arts Council more than thirty years of experience in the public sector and the federal cultural arena. In addition to the NEH, Mittelman held a senior position at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia and served as curator at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Monica

The recent Helicon Collaborative report examines continuing (and increased) inequities in funding to culturally-specific arts organizations across the country. An article in American Theatre discusses the results of the study and offers data and examples from cities facing funding equity challenges, including how some have made intentional efforts toward progress.

On advancing progress, Holly Sidford of Helicon Collaborative says, “No one funder is going to be able to change the picture, and most nonprofit organizations get the bulk of their money from local sources. So it’s only by groups of foundations in a given place coming together and saying, ‘These numbers are unacceptable and we’re going to work together to change them,’ that real change can happen.”

Read the full article on American Theatre.

Posted on July 20, 2017 by Monica

Grantmakers in the Arts is pleased to announce the release of new research on the formula-based funding practices of public arts funders and united arts funds. Through interviews with sixteen leaders of public arts funders and united arts funds, Recalculating the Formula for Success documents the new ways that these funders are approaching their work, rethinking longtime practices, and adapting to changing environments.

Read the report.

Posted on July 20, 2017 by Monica

From The Architect's Newspaper:

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled the city’s first ever cultural plan, CreateNYC, which has been in the works for months. CreateNYC is a blueprint for expanding the Big Apple’s cultural sector; it mainly focuses on increasing diversity across museum boards and addressing historically underserved communities.

Funding will come from the mayor’s office, with an additional $5 million from City Council to be allocated. The majority of it will go towards less prominent arts groups—especially those that lay outside of Manhattan. Approximately $1.5 million will be directed towards increasing support for low-income communities and underrepresented groups, while $4.5 million will be used to support the Cultural Institutions Group (CIG) in low-income communities.

Posted on July 19, 2017 by Monica

The Native Arts & Cultures Foundation has released a report evaluating the social impact of the four pilot projects of its Community Inspiration Program. The evaluation framework layers multiple approaches to holistically consider the effect these projects had within their communities and on the issues the artists strove to address: climate change, the veracity of Indigenous knowledge, US/Mexico border relations, the definition of community, and storytelling for social and environmental justice.

Read the report from Native Arts & Cultures Foundation.

Posted on July 18, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in The New York Times discusses how family foundations are navigating generational changes and younger family members take on roles alongside, and sometimes in place of, founding family members:

It used to be that the philanthropic baton would be passed to the next generation when the parents died. In the past, fewer generations actively worked together.
Posted on July 17, 2017 by Monica

GIA's latest update on the National Endowment for the Arts and other threatened federal agencies comes from our federal policy firm, Penn Hill Group (Washington, DC). A recent post on Arts Funders Respond has the latest information on subcommittee budget recommendations for the federal departments and programs related to education and the arts:

Posted on July 17, 2017 by Monica

The Kenneth Rainin Foundation announced the appointment of Ted Russell as associate director of arts strategy and ventures. Russell joins the foundation with high-level arts management expertise developed through years working as an artist and arts marketing executive as well as a grantmaker. Russell’s experience includes a decade serving as the senior program officer for the arts program at the James Irvine Foundation. He has served on the board of directors of Grantmakers in the Arts since 2016.

Posted on July 11, 2017 by Monica

An article in The Denver Post cites data from a report by Fidelity Charitable pointing to the fact that “women of all ages and stages of life are more generous than their male counterparts”:

The data reported by this study indicate significant changes and opportunities in philanthropy –now and in the long term. As women continue to acquire more education, career opportunities, leadership positions and wealth (both earned and inherited), their desire and capacity to play a meaningful role in philanthropy will grow proportionately.
Posted on July 11, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, artist-in-residence Dylan Klempner reflects on the power of the arts to support medical patients and their loved ones in times of crisis. Read “Of Birds and Butterflies: On the Convergence of Arts and Health Care.”

Posted on July 11, 2017 by Monica

In a three-part series of articles, Helicon Collaborative has released the key findings of its study on cultural equity issues in philanthropy:

Helicon Collaborative released Not Just Money: Equity Issues in Cultural Philanthropy, a research study conducted with funding from the Surdna Foundation. The study continues our examination of inequities in arts funding in the U.S., starting with Fusing Art, Culture and Social Change in 2011, published by the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy. Not Just Money looks at the picture now, to see what has changed in that time.

Spoiler alert: despite important efforts by many leading foundations, funding overall has gotten less equitable, not more. This means that cultural philanthropy is not effectively — or equitably — supporting our evolving cultural landscape.

Read the research findings from Helicon Collaborative.
Download the full report.

Posted on July 7, 2017 by Monica

The National Assembly of State Arts Agencies has released the State Arts Agency Legislative Appropriations Preview, Fiscal Year 2018. This document summarizes how state arts agencies fared during this year's budget deliberations and includes information on the appropriations each state arts agency expects to receive for FY2018, which began July 1, 2017.

View the document.

Posted on July 6, 2017 by Monica

An article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review discusses how grantmaking policies affect the financial stability of nonprofits, as researched by Michael Etzel, a partner at Bridgespan, a nonprofit consultancy, and Hilary Pennington, a vice president at the Ford Foundation. The duo developed a grantmaking pyramid which "reframes how funders and grantees think about building organizations," emphasizing the need for "foundational" support at the base of the pyramid. This strategy is now being utilized by the Ford Foundation to examine their grantmaking portfolio.

Read the article on the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Posted on July 6, 2017 by Steve

An article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “Buying Time and Fanning Flames,” was written as a follow-up to Grantmakers in the Arts’ Funder Forum on Arts in Medicine in February 2017. Bill Cleveland, who facilitated the forum, reflects on the event and offers thoughts on the need for cross-sector collaboration to build infrastructure and program development that will further professionalize the field of arts in medicine.

Posted on July 5, 2017 by Monica

An article in EdSource discusses the challenges affecting arts education in California, using recent data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress:

Students in the western U.S., which covers 13 states including California, showed slight improvements in their overall arts and music scores since 2008, but lagged in arts enrollment, with arts attendance dropping from 35 percent in 2008 to 33 percent in 2016. By contrast, almost 70 percent of students in the northeast were enrolled in a music or art class.

Read the full article.

Posted on July 5, 2017 by Steve

New on the GIA Podcast, Captain Sara Kass, MD, a military and medical advisor, shares her thoughts on the role of the arts in helping current military members, veterans, and their loved ones heal from emotional and physical injuries resulting from their service.

Posted on July 1, 2017 by SuJ'n

For the summer months of July and August, GIA's photo banner features work and artists supported by Aroha Philanthropies. The foundation derives its name, Aroha, from the core value of the Maori culture of New Zealand which encapsulates many community-centered attributes: love, selflessness, tolerance, kindness, compassion, and generosity. Its work focuses in three main areas: Vitality + Art (ages 55+), Joy + Art (K-12), and Humanity + Art (residential mental health organizations for adults).

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