GRANTMAKERS IN THE ARTS SEEKS NEW CEO
GIA has contracted Koya Leadership Partners to conduct a search for its new CEO, and the position profile is now available online. As announced in December, GIA President & CEO Janet Brown will step down from her position at the end of 2017.
Posted on April 24, 2017 by Monica

Laura Zucker has announced her plans to leave her position as executive director of the Los Angeles County Arts Commission on July 31, 2017. Zucker has been a driving force in the development and support of the arts and culture ecosystem of Los Angeles County over the last 25 years. Under Zucker’s guidance, the County’s organizational grant program grew eight-fold and now funds almost 400 nonprofit arts organizations through a two-year $9 million grant program.

Posted on April 24, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in The Denver Post highlights a new public-private partnership to fund arts programs that also support human services:

The grants are a public-private partnership between the state, through its Colorado Creative Industries division, Denver’s Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and the Hemera Foundation, based in Boulder.

It’s rare for government and nonprofit grant-makers to work together, but even more unusual for them to break out of their regimens. Bonfils-Stantion CEO Gary Steuer said it happened because the foundations saw these cross-over efforts happening organically in the community and wanted to come up with a way to provide support.

More and more, artists and performers were offering programs with a social service component — not just making art for art’s sake, but conducting theater workshops at rec centers and presenting plays to combat teen suicide.

Posted on April 20, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review discusses how some foundations are using a systems change approach to work toward social change in the current political climate. "A key differentiator for systems change foundations," author Mark R. Kramer writes, "is that they no longer try to pilot a small-scale program first and then take it to scale later; they confront the system at scale from the start."

Posted on April 20, 2017 by Monica

A collaboration of the National Endowment for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the [Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account] is the first federal effort to provide in-depth analysis of the arts and cultural sector's contributions to the U.S. economy. This latest ACPSA data is from 2014 and reveals that the arts and cultural sector contributed $729.6 billion or 4.2 percent to the U.S. economy that year. Between 1998 and 2014, the contribution of arts and culture to the nation’s gross domestic product grew by 35.1 percent.

Posted on April 19, 2017 by Monica

In a recent blog post, June Wilson and Lenore Hanisch of the Quixote Foundation discuss the decision to close the foundation and spend its entire endowment:

Spending up allowed us to see clearly that our philanthropy was not about our personal, family or institutional legacy, it was about the work of our grantees and the change they work tirelessly to realize. It enabled us to embrace conflict and seek resolution. It encouraged us to approach our grantmaking strategy with a greater sense of creativity, not restriction. Knowing that we had limited time and resources, we found a clearer path that was ultimately more satisfying to us as individuals and more impactful for our organization and the field.
Posted on April 19, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Sonia BasSheva Mañjon writes about her work with Ohio State University to investigate economic empowerment with an arts and culture lens in order to better understand the needs in rural America. Read “From Whitesburg, Kentucky, to Washington Court House, Ohio: An Academic Explores Economic Empowerment through Cultural Revitalization.”

Posted on April 17, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in Valley News highlights a new arts education program for older adults in New Hampshire supported by Aroha Philanthropies:

The idea behind the program’s design is based in a growing body of research that shows that “more intensive, skill-based, sequential arts learning is particularly valuable to older adults, and is shown to have a variety of health and social benefits,” Selchen said.

According to one 2006 study funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, seniors who participated in cultural programs like Experience/Arts reported better physical health and morale, and less loneliness, one year after the completion of their programs compared to control groups who did not participate in those programs.

Posted on April 14, 2017 by Monica

From The Architect's Newspaper:

Jason Schupbach has been selected as the new director of the Design School at Arizona State University’s (ASU) Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

Schupbach is considered one of the founding leaders of the national creative placemaking movement and will head to ASU after working as the director of design and creative placemaking programs for the National Endowment of the Arts. At the NEA, Schupbach oversees Our Town and Art Works grants, the Mayor’s Institute on City Design, the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design, as well as the NEA’s community development-related federal agency collaborations.

Posted on April 14, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in The Washington Post highlights how funding from the National Endowment for the Arts supports arts and culture across Indiana, including in many small towns and rural areas:

In Indiana, artists and nonprofit leaders in small towns or underserved communities fear that lawmakers don’t understand how much they depend on the millions of arts dollars distributed each year outside booming metropolises. NEA dollars give children access to the arts at a time when schools are cutting back. They provide performances for people who don’t live in cultural centers. They keep such handmade traditions as basket-weaving and quiltmaking alive.
Posted on April 13, 2017 by Monica

A recent article in Surface magazine highlights the work of the Center for Cultural Innovation and its pilot program, the Creative Industries Incentive Network:

This year, through a pilot program called the Creative Industries Incentive Network (CIIN)—which operates in L.A., Richmond, San Francisco, San Jose, and Santa Ana—and its Los Angeles Creative Economic Development Fund, CCI will give $100,000 in grants, each up to $12,500, to a wide range of culturally minded start-ups and various five-person-and-under ventures. [CEO Angie Kim] describes the fund, which aims to spur economic impact in L.A. through art, this way: “These are grants for artists who are pursuing an artistic practice in order to have a positive social impact, using a commercial business strategy.”
Posted on April 12, 2017 by Monica

The Nonprofit Quarterly has published an in-depth article on nonprofit financial capital, covering various types of capital, how nonprofits obtain capital, and various methods for monitoring and financial reporting.

Grantmakers in the Arts offers workshops on capitalization and nonprofit financial health for funders and their grantees. Read more about our Conversations on Capitalization and Community workshops.

Posted on April 12, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Michele Kumi Baer of The New York Community Trust writes about the formation of and lessons learned from the New York City Cultural Agenda Fund, a collaborative fund focused on cultural policy and advocacy that was created in the wake of New York City’s last mayoral election. Read “Seizing Opportunity amid Uncertainty: Lessons in Funder Collaboration.”

Posted on April 10, 2017 by Janet

By Janet Brown from her blog "Better Together"

There are many arguments for continued federal funding to the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities (NEA and NEH), the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) — all agencies that would be eliminated by President Trump’s 2018 budget and crippled in his recommended 2017 budget.

Posted on April 10, 2017 by Monica

From The Deseret News:

Victoria Panella Bourns has been named director of the Utah Division of Arts & Museums. She has directed the Salt Lake County Zoo Arts and Parks (ZAP) program for the past 12 years. The program distributes approximately $14 million annually to more than 170 arts and cultural organizations. Prior to joining ZAP, she assisted cultural organizations and other nonprofits with strategic planning, board development and executive searches through Panella Consulting.
Posted on April 5, 2017 by Monica

From KPCC:

The [Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors] voted unanimously to advance a proposal, brought forward by supervisors Hilda Solis and Sheila Kuehl, with specific recommendations to increase ethnic, socio-economic and gender diversity in the staffing and audience of arts organizations.

Those recommendations come after 18 months of work. The [LA County Arts Commission] has held town hall meetings attended by 650 community members and solicited input from peers in other cities.

Read the full article from KPCC.

Posted on April 5, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Jesse Rosen, president and CEO of the League of American Orchestras, discusses the League’s work addressing diversity in the orchestra field. “A New Will to Confront Homogeneity in American Orchestras,” presents the results of two of the League’s studies on the racial and gender demographics of the field and efforts to support inclusion of African American and Latino musicians through fellowships.

Posted on April 4, 2017 by Monica

From UCLA:

National Medal of Arts recipient and nine-time Grammy winner Herb Alpert will be awarded the UCLA Medal, the campus’s highest honor, on June 16 at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music’s inaugural commencement ceremony. . . . In the 1980s, Alpert began to devote himself to philanthropy in support of artists, arts education, and compassion and well-being. Launched in 1988 by Alpert and [wife Lani Hall], the Herb Alpert Foundation creates opportunities that enable people of all ages and socioeconomic levels to harness their creativity, develop their talents and lead more productive and fulfilling lives.
Posted on April 1, 2017 by SuJ'n

For the month of April, GIA’s photo banner features work supported by The Heinz Endowments’ Transformative Arts Process (TAP) program. As an organization, The Heinz Endowments comprises two private foundations, the Howard Heinz Endowment and the Vira I. Heinz Endowment, that share a mission to help southwestern Pennsylvania thrive economically, ecologically, educationally, and culturally.

Posted on March 31, 2017 by Monica

A new study funded by The New York Community Trust and Surdna Foundation found correlation between the presence of arts and culture resources and the health, safety, and well-being of low and moderate income neighborhoods in New York City. According to the report, culture does not work alone but is one ingredient that makes neighborhoods stronger. The findings will be used by The Trust and Surdna Foundation in grantmaking, and by the City’s Department of Cultural Affairs to design a cultural plan for the city later this year.

Posted on March 31, 2017 by Monica

As reported by Tampa Bay Times, Michael Killoren, director of local arts agencies and Challenge America at the National Endowment for the Arts, has accepted a position as executive director of the Morean Arts Center in St. Petersburg, Florida:

Killoren, 60, has worked at the NEA since 2010 as the head of Local Arts Agencies and Challenge America, programs that support arts and culture at the local level. Before that, he was the head of Seattle's Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs, where he led an initiative to restore arts education in public schools. In 2001, he was tapped to serve as Seattle's first director of cultural tourism.
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