WE MOURN WITH OAKLAND ARTIST COMMUNITY
Grantmakers in the Arts extends its deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those who died in the Oakland fire. Although this tragedy occurred in Oakland, it is a reflection of the rising costs of housing and artist work spaces in cities across America. Thank you to the GIA members, both public and private, working to find solutions.
Posted on December 7, 2016 by Monica

Kresge Foundation President and CEO Rip Rapson delivered the keynote address, "Why Comprehensive Community Development is Essential Now, and Why the Arts Must be at the Table," at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. on Dec. 6, 2016. The talk was part of the 50th anniversary celebration of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), at a conference on Creative Placemaking and Community Development sponsored by the NEA, The Kresge Foundation, ArtPlace America, Art Works and Partners for Livable Communities. The conference drew artists, community development experts, and policymakers to examine the role of the arts in shaping neighborhoods, towns and cities.

Posted on December 7, 2016 by Steve

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Alexis Frasz, codirector of Helicon Collaborative, interviews Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

Posted on December 7, 2016 by Monica

From KQED:

On Tuesday, Oakland officials announced the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Kenneth Rainin Foundation are providing Oakland with a $1.7 million grant to help arts groups stay in Oakland in a viciously competitive real estate market.

The Community Arts Stabilization Trust (CAST), an organization which helps broker real estate deals for cultural organizations, will administer the grants. “The assumption is not that artists or arts organizations are un-businesslike, but simply the making of art is a different core business than real estate development,” CAST executive director Moy Eng says.

Posted on December 5, 2016 by Monica

In a letter to members today, Grantmakers in the Arts President & CEO Janet Brown announced that she will step down from her position at the end of 2017. Brown has been CEO of GIA since January 1, 2009.

“GIA is in a great position to move to another level of effectiveness, and I feel new leadership will do that best,” Brown explained. “It has been an honor to lead an organization that has such a passionate board, staff, and membership who believe in the power of artists and the arts to reflect and change us. Although I am leaving GIA, I am not leaving the field and am excited about the opportunities that may present themselves for my involvement.”

The board will conduct a national search for Brown’s replacement led by incoming board chair Angelique Power, president of The Field Foundation of Illinois.

Read the press release.

Posted on December 1, 2016 by Monica

New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA), in collaboration with Metris Arts Consulting, released Moving Dance Forward: NEFA’s National Dance Project at 20 & Critical Field Trends. This study evaluates the historic contributions of the NEFA’s National Dance Project to the development of the dance field, and investigates how choreographers today create their work and economically sustain themselves, as well as their motivations for touring.

Read the report.

Posted on December 1, 2016 by Monica

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has recently published How to Do Creative Placemaking: An Action-Oriented Guide to Arts in Community Development. The book features 28 essays from thought leaders active in arts-based community development as well as 13 case studies of projects funded through the NEA’s creative placemaking program, Our Town.

Posted on December 1, 2016 by Monica

From the Philanthropy News Digest:

Over the past decade, U.S. orchestras have relied more on philanthropic support than on ticket sales for their income, a report from the League of American Orchestras finds.

[Fourty] percent of the total income in 2014 of the sixty-five member orchestras in the study, or some $520 million, was classified as earned income, with three-quarters of that from performance and related activities; 43 percent, or $569 million, from contributed income; and 17 percent, or $229 million, from investment income. ... The study also found that the league’s member orchestras managed to contain growth in expenses during the recession, and that the share reporting deficits in unrestricted net assets fell from 40 percent in 2010 to 18 percent in 2014.

Read more.

Posted on November 30, 2016 by Steve

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Alexis Frasz, codirector of Helicon Collaborative provides a summary of GIA’s Arts and Environmental Sustainability Thought Leader Forum, which brought together arts and environmental funders to discuss cross-sector work.

Posted on November 28, 2016 by Monica

A recent article in The New York Times highlights the work of individuals and organizations making impact investments in the arts, including Upstart Co-Lab, SeaChange Capital Partners, and Calvert Foundation. “Channeling investments into real estate is the easiest route … because many arts organizations have buildings and a need to upgrade or maintain them.”

Posted on November 23, 2016 by Monica

President-elect Donald Trump has selected Betsy DeVos as his nominee for Secretary of Education.

“DeVos, 58, chairs the American Federation for Children, an advocacy group that has aggressively pushed to expand charter schools and school voucher programs that provide families with public money to spend on private school tuition,” according to Politico.

Read the article.

Posted on November 23, 2016 by Monica

The governor of Kentucky recently announced the restructuring of the Kentucky Arts Council in order to “focus on ensuring that Kentucky artisans have the skills and knowledge to develop and successfully sell their products.” As reported by WFPL, Louisville’s NPR news station, the council’s restructuring has sparked conversation and concern about the relationship between intrinsic and economic value of the arts.

Read the article.

Posted on November 21, 2016 by Monica

A recent article in Crain’s Chicago Business highlights the work of Enrich Chicago, “a coalition of 14 nonprofits and seven foundations whose goal is racial equity, in terms of management, funding, and artist support, for Chicago-area ALAANA nonprofits by 2050.” The coalition was founded in 2014 by Angelique Power, GIA board member and president of The Field Foundation of Illinois, and Brett Batterson, former executive director of Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University.

Read the article.

Posted on November 17, 2016 by Monica

In a recent editorial in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Vu Le advocates for a “new social contract” between nonprofits and foundations in response to the recent presidential election. Le urges foundations to do away with “old ways of doing business” and offers nine ways that foundations can better support nonprofits through changes in funding practices and policies.

Posted on November 16, 2016 by Monica

As the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture releases its Racial Equity Statement, Director Randy Engstrom writes on how the arts can lead the way to cross-sector, community-wide change:

Arts are how we can achieve racial equity in our institutions, and in our lives. They hold the power to capture, nourish and move us. They serve as a vehicle for radical social change, and are an effective strategy to address the pressing issues of our time. We believe that we need to center the arts in our strategy, but look beyond our field to affect change structurally, in partnership with the community, City departments, other institutions and jurisdictions, so we can help build racial equity in housing, criminal justice, education, jobs, the environment and more.

Read the full article.

Posted on November 16, 2016 by Monica

In a statement from President and CEO Rip Rapson, The Kresge Foundation reaffirms its commitment to justice and the public good:

As national discourse and energy pivots from campaign mode into the realities of governance, philanthropy is particularly called upon to identify and actualize its values and missions to ensure that society heals and progresses in a positive, just, and affirming way.

We need, above all, to affirm, elevate, and amplify the work that we and our nonprofit, public, academic, and private sector partners do. But we also need to be crystal clear about the values that undergird our reason for being. We need to anchor our aspirations and actions in the unalterable bedrock of what we stand for.

Posted on November 15, 2016 by Steve

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “Supporting Community Arts Leadership,” William Cleveland, director of the Center for the Study of Art & Community, discusses the importance of arts-based community development.

Posted on November 15, 2016 by Monica

Darren Walker, president of Ford Foundation, has issued a letter to philanthropic partners, grantees, and friends on the need for hope and dedication following the recent election:

If we are to overwhelm the forces of inequality and injustice — if we are to dedicate ourselves anew to the hard and heavy lifting of building the beloved community — then the cornerstone of our efforts must be hope.
Posted on November 10, 2016 by Steve

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader entitled “Shaping a Brighter Future: the Canada Council Transforms for the Next Generation,” Simon Brault, director and CEO of the Canada Council for the Arts, writes about how the agency underwent institutional transformation with a new funding model and strategic plan to better serve a changing nation.

Posted on November 9, 2016 by Monica

By Jennifer Brown, writing for The Denver Post:

A 0.1 percent sales tax for arts and culture in Denver’s seven-county metro area passed overwhelmingly, as supporters called it a “bright ray of sunshine voters could agree on,” according to unofficial results.

The tax funds the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, which has been in existence for 28 years. Without another thumbs up from voters, it would have expired next summer. The measure — called 4B — extends the tax until 2030.

Posted on November 8, 2016 by Monica

A data dashboard published by The Chronicle of Philanthropy reveals online giving trends based on donations made via Network for Good. The dashboard breaks down the dollar amount and quantity of donations for various regions, causes, and time periods. As of November 1, 2016, “arts, culture, and humanities” ranked eleventh in number of donations (approximately 144,000) and tenth in total amount donated ($17.4 million) in a 13-month period.

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