For the month of October, GIA’s photo banner features artists and work supported by Target. Target’s support of the arts and culture dates back to 1946 when the company first began giving 5 percent of its profit to local communities. Today, this giving equals more than $4 million each week. Target is a Leadership Sponsor of the 2016 GIA Conference taking place this month in Saint Paul, neighbor to Target’s headquarters in Minneapolis. Read more here.
Posted on October 19, 2016 by Steve

GIA conference blogger Ebony McKinney summarizes the session Artists and the New Economy, held on Tuesday, October 18:

Alexis Frasz, of Helicon Collaborative, began by explaining that the research group which included Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI) and National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) started with a design challenge:
What are the conditions in which artists live and work today and what will it look like for them to live sustainably, create good work and contribute to their communities? Also: Where is our support system now in terms of what we think is ideal? If its not there, what would we do to adjust it?

This field-wide temperature check and list of implications resulted in Creativity Connects: Trends and Conditions Affecting US Artists, released in September 2016, with support from Surdna Foundation and Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. This report is somewhat of a refresh of Investing in Creativity, a 2006 paper from the Urban Institute authored by Dr. Maria Rosario Jackson. One of the major innovations of Jackson’s analysis was a framework that contained six structures that artists need to do their work. Validation, Demands and Markets, Material Supports, Training, Communities and Networks, and Information remain a focal point today.

Read the full post.

Posted on October 19, 2016 by Steve

Lara Davis reports on her Monday session at the 2016 GIA Conference:

Today, I had the opportunity to attend a session highlighting the work of cultural partnership in Montgomery, Alabama entitled, “Creative Placemaking in the Racialized South.” Reading the session description, I was drawn in by two things: one, the focus on Black community; two, the description of geography within the context of race. I wanted to get a sense for what the emphasis on social identity and place is yielding in a region that is as Black as it is White. (I am Black, and live in Seattle where the population of Black people is 8%.)

Read the full post.

Posted on October 19, 2016 by Steve

Ebony McKinney reports from Saint Paul on Monday sessions at the 2016 GIA Conference:

Creativity Connections, a report recently released by Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI) and National Endowent for the Arts (NEA) summarize current trends that play a role in artists ability to have healthy creative practices and features systems that support or fall short in supporting artist endeavours. Among those fundings, (Judilee) Reed brought focus to:
  • Artists moving from conventional discipline based systems of creation and presenting such as gallery presentations and dance performances to hybrid contexts that utilize their training in new ways and to reflect larger community concerns like social justice, urban planning, public architecture, health and human services
  • Further suggestions that economic conditions for artists imitate challenges in other segments of the work force really related to the gig economy. For example, high cost of housing, insufficient protections and limited access to capital to push forward enterprises

While I think everyone in the room understands that contributed income is important, other types of financial support have to be considered and included. In this scenario the resources, beyond the $2B described above, could potentially be expanded to include other resource systems. This could have transformational and lasting effects for arts and culture and for the last few years, Surdna, Kresge and others have been looking to alternative finance – “financial channels and instruments that lie outside of traditional finance systems such as commercial lending or banks” according to Reed.

Read the full post.

Posted on October 17, 2016 by Steve

Ebony McKinney posts from the 2016 GIA Conference:

It was a wonderful dense day, and I along with several participants lamented how little time was left for reflection. Ideas about cultivating new modes of adaptive leadership, surfacing covert and overt inequities in organizations, making difficult left turns, creating space for artists with disabilities and networks, finance tools and leadership pathways to support creative lives swirled. Much to consider, much to do, but really at the end of the day I’m left with a feeling of steely optimism, intention and the mural/poem on the back wall of Intermedia Arts.

Read the full post.

Posted on October 17, 2016 by Steve

Lara Davis posts from the 2016 GIA Conference in Saint Paul, Minnesota:

This year, I began my GIA Conference as co-facilitator for the “Access to a Lifetime of Arts Education: Every Child, Every Adult” preconference. My pal and coconspirator in the work of racial justice, consultant and theatre teaching artist Tina LaPadula, joined me to lead a session on Social Justice Essentials for Arts Funders. We kicked off this day of learning and dialogue centered on arts education, data, and creative aging with an engaged crew of thirty plus grantmakers from across the nation, representing family foundations, government, and corporate giving.

Read the full post.

Posted on October 12, 2016 by Monica

The 2016 GIA Conference is taking place Sunday, October 16 to Wednesday, October 19. The GIA Conference provides the only opportunity for arts grantmakers from across the country to come together to share knowledge and ideas, develop collective strategies, and learn about the latest initiatives in arts grantmaking. GIA will post live updates throughout the conference on its Twitter and Facebook pages.

Posted on October 12, 2016 by Monica

As part of a lecture series at Rothko Chapel, Ford Foundation President Darren Walker recently spoke with Sarah Lewis, author and Harvard professor, about the intersection of the arts and human rights. Audio and video recordings of the talk are available online.

Posted on October 12, 2016 by Monica

Lisa Cremin, a director with the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and former GIA board member, has been recognized with a 2016 Governor’s Award for the Arts & Humanities. Cremin began working with the Community Foundation in 1993 and under her guidance its arts fund has grown to its current size of $9.2 million and in its lifetime has given away more than $12 million. She has been a dedicated advocate and evangelist for small to mid-sized arts organizations — groups producing powerful work — that provide access to the arts to underserved communities.

Posted on October 11, 2016 by Monica

From The Advocate:

The Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge is offering Creative Relief grants to professional artists and nonprofit arts and culture organizations that were adversely affected by the flood.

Individuals and organizations with a history of arts programming whose sites, materials, equipment or collections were damaged in the recent flooding may apply.

Read the full article.

Posted on October 7, 2016 by Monica

The League of American Orchestras has released two reports on diversity in orchestras. The first, Forty Years of Fellowships, analyzes the efficacy and impact of fellowship programs for African American and Latino musicians. The second report, Racial/Ethnic and Gender Diversity in the Orchestra Field examines diversity among orchestra staff, boards, conductors and instrumentalists.

Read the reports.

Posted on October 6, 2016 by Monica

South Arts has published a list of resources for artists and arts venues in preparation for Hurricane Matthew in the southeastern United States. Resources include AgilityRecovery’s hurricane readiness checklist, the CERF+ Studio Protector online guide, and resources from FEMA and American Red Cross.

Read more

Posted on October 6, 2016 by Monica

The passing of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provides states with increased flexibility to include the arts as a component of a well-rounded education. A new report from the Arts Education Partnership (AEP), a center within Education Commission of the States, ESSA: Mapping Opportunities for the Arts, highlights the ways that states can engage the arts in the ongoing implementation of ESSA.

Read the report.

Posted on October 5, 2016 by Monica

The New York State Council on the Arts had announced Mara Manus as the agency’s new executive director. Manus has served as executive director of the Public Theater in New York City as well as a program officer at the Ford Foundation. Previous roles also include director of Playwrights of New York, executive director of The Film Society of Lincoln Center and founding director of the Arthur Miller Foundation and Southampton Arts Center.

Posted on October 4, 2016 by Monica

The President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH) and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts have opened applications for school districts, foundations, or nonprofits to apply to join Turnaround Arts, a program to assist school reform through high-quality and integrated arts education. Selected organizations will partner with Turnaround Arts: National to build locally-based technical assistance programs, bringing in national and regional resources to use the arts as an intervention strategy in clusters of low-performing schools, and their work will begin in March 2017.

View the application.

Posted on October 1, 2016 by SuJ'n

For the month of October, GIA's photo banner features artists and work supported by Target. Target's support of the arts and culture dates back to 1946 when the company first began giving 5 percent of its profit to local communities. Today, this giving equals more than $4 million each week. Target is a Leadership Sponsor of the 2016 GIA Conference taking place this month in Saint Paul, MN, neighbor to Target's headquarters in Minneapolis.

Posted on September 29, 2016 by Monica

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and The Kresge Foundation are partnering to expand support of creative placemaking through the launch of a pilot technical assistance program in collaboration with Local Initiatives Support Corporation's National Creative Placemaking Program (LISC) and PolicyLink. Specialized technical assistance will be given to 14 organizations and their partners with the goal of advancing each organization’s ability to lead successful projects that result in positive short- and long-term outcomes for their community.

Posted on September 29, 2016 by Monica

Esteemed arts administrator Arlynn “Arni” Fishbaugh will retire at the end of September after serving as executive director of Montana Arts Council for 25 years. On September 30, Arni will be honored with a Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Montana. Arni served on the board Grantmakers in the Arts for six years (2011–2016) and has also served the boards of the National Assembly of Arts Agencies, the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, and the Western States Arts Federation.

Posted on September 28, 2016 by Monica

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Michael Warlum, who worked for Robert E. Gard at Wisconsin Idea Theatre, reflects on the continued influence of Gard's The Arts in the Small Community fifty years after its publication.

Posted on September 27, 2016 by Monica

A new report commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation surveys the efforts of 15 foundations, including Ford Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and Surdna Foundation, that are working to “incorporate equity — both in their internal operations and in their grantmaking.” The Road to Achieving Equity presents key findings from the survey, challenges the foundations have faced, and recommendations for foundations looking to begin their own work toward equity.

Read the report.

Posted on September 22, 2016 by Monica

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has announced the names of the 2016 MacArthur Fellows. Among the awardees are author Claudia Rankine, who presented an inspiring keynote at the 2015 GIA Conference, and theatre artist and educator Anne Basting, who has worked with GIA to support arts and aging. Each of the 23 MacArthur Fellows will receive a stipend of $625,000.

View the announcement.

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