GIA Blog

Posted on July 1, 2017 by SuJ'n

For the summer months of July and August, GIA's photo banner features work and artists supposed by Aroha Philanthropies. The foundation derives its name, Aroha, from the core value of the Maori culture of New Zealand which encapsulates many community-centered attributes: love, selflessness, tolerance, kindness, compassion, and generosity. Its work focuses in three main areas: Vitality + Art (ages 55+), Joy + Art (K-12), and Humanity + Art (residental mental health organizations for adults).

Posted on June 30, 2017 by Monica

Beth Tuttle, president and CEO of DataArts, announced that she will resign from her leadership role in the organization. DataArts, formerly known as the Cultural Data Project, is the respected national resource for in-depth data about nonprofit arts and culture organizations. Tuttle, who has led the organization since March 2013, will remain in her role through October 6, 2017.

Posted on June 29, 2017 by Monica

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed a state budget that includes a $6.8 million permanent increased funding allocation for the California Arts Council.

The budget also includes an additional $750,000 ongoing allocation to directly support increased arts programming for youth engaged in California's juvenile justice system, as well as an additional $2 million increased allocation for California's Arts in Corrections program.

Posted on June 29, 2017 by Monica

The National Organization for Arts and Health will hold its first annual conference, in conjunction with the Healthcare Facilities Symposium and Expo (HFSE), in Austin, Texas. The conference is open to anyone interested in the field of Arts in Health and will provide an opportunity to learn from best practice approaches around the nation, from individual artists to the major health care centers in America.

Posted on June 29, 2017 by Monica

The Montana Arts Council (MAC) has announces Tatiana Gant as its new executive director. For the last four years, Gant has served as the executive director for the Illinois Arts Council (IAC). Prior to directing the IAC, she worked for more than a decade developing and leading arts education programs for the agency.

Posted on June 28, 2017 by Steve

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Dr. Gay Hanna reports back from GIA’s Funder Forum on Arts in Medicine, where funders and thought leaders gathered to discuss how to support the growing field of artists working in clinical settings — using the healing power of art to support patient and community well-being.

Posted on June 27, 2017 by Monica

On Monday, June 26, GIA’s board of directors sent a letter to all members of Congress on behalf of GIA’s membership in support of continued funding of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Posted on June 23, 2017 by Monica

In an email to colleagues, Executive Director Carlton Turner announced his decision to end his tenure at Alternate ROOTS effective February 2018.

I have spent the past thirteen years as a ROOTS' staff member, in service to the ROOTS mission of supporting artists working at the intersection of arts and social justice. In that time, I have seen the organization grow its roots deeper in its founding principles, while the coverage of its canopy stretched wider to encompass more and more creatives. All of this happening as ROOTS' profile as a regional organization with national institutional impact has expanded to be more accessible and equitable than ever. It is a great time to transition.
Posted on June 23, 2017 by Monica

Americans for the Arts recently released its Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 report, which compiles national data to examine the economic impact of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences. As reported on Hyperallergic:

The report, tabulated with the help of economists from the Georgia Institute of Technology, draws from detailed spending and attendance figures provided by 14,439 cultural organizations and a whopping 212,691 audience surveys. It offers startlingly detailed figures about US citizens’ typical cultural consumption patterns and the way cultural organizations’ spending generates even more economic activity in their communities.
Posted on June 22, 2017 by Monica

Larry Kramer, president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, has recently published an article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review:

No topic in philanthropy has generated as much interest and excitement in recent years as impact investing. And while talk has so far exceeded action by a wide margin, that’s starting to change as the steady drumbeat to join the party gains momentum. Yet the very one-sidedness of the discussion—and it has been entirely one-sided—gives me pause. For there are good reasons to hesitate before jumping down the for-profit rabbit hole, particularly for large grantmaking foundations like Hewlett.