GIA Blog

Posted on May 30, 2017 by Monica

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has approved funding for a second cohort of a new program that supports long-time executive directors who are planning a transition. The program, called What’s Next: Leading a Thriving Transition, is administered by Third Sector New England. Leadership transitions — especially those of long-time leaders — can raise specific challenges and opportunities for executives, boards, and the organizations they lead.

Posted on May 24, 2017 by Monica

Animating Democracy, a program of Americans for the Arts, has released a new framework for evaluating creative work at the intersection of arts and civic engagement, community development, and justice. Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change presents eleven artistic attributes that “address the potency of creative expression to embody and motivate change.” The framework aims to elevate aesthetics in civically and socially engaged art, help describe and assess the work, expand criteria for considering aesthetics in the work, address historical domination of Euro-American aesthetic standards, and promote deeper appreciation of the rigor required for effective creative work.

Posted on May 24, 2017 by Monica

After more than a decade as the executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts and a 40-year career in the arts field, Robert C. Booker will retire from his current position on August 7, 2017. He will be succeeded by Jaime Dempsey, who has served as the agency's Deputy Director since 2006. Booker served as chair of the Grantmakers in the Arts board of directors from 2015–2016.

Posted on May 23, 2017 by Monica

President Trump has released the full version of his 2018 budget plan. From artnet News:

Donald Trump’s much-anticipated 2018 budget proposes steep cuts to domestic programs—including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

According to a CNN report, which cites an outline of the budget released last night, the proposal “doubles down on some largely symbolic cuts” first rolled out by the administration earlier this year, including the elimination of the NEA. As usual, however, Congress remains intent on writing its own budget, so Trump’s plan is unlikely to go far on Capitol Hill. Trump’s proposal, CNN notes, is more a statement of policy than a practical budget that is expected to be adopted in full.

Posted on May 22, 2017 by Monica

William D. Adams, the tenth chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, announced today his resignation from the agency, effective Tuesday, May 23, 2017. In a brief statement to staff, Adams expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to serve as the chairman of NEH and his admiration for the work of the agency. Deputy Chair Margaret Plympton will serve as acting chair.

Posted on May 18, 2017 by Monica

Steven J. Tepper, dean of the Herberger Institute for Design in the Arts at Arizona State University, recently presented the keynote address at ArtsFund's 29th Annual Celebration of the Arts Luncheon. His speech titled “Creativity, Education, and Work in the 21st Century” makes the case for the vital necessity of creativity in today’s society as we face unprecedented rates of growth and change. Tepper was also a keynote presenter at the 2014 GIA Conference in Houston, Texas.

Posted on May 17, 2017 by Monica

From the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF):

WESTAF has expanded its advocacy work on behalf of the National Endowment for the Arts. Recently, three contractors were hired to focus exclusively on this project and to work closely with our regional network of advocates. WESTAF has also created an NEA Advocacy enter with the latest updates on the NEA FY18 budget as well as an Advocacy Toolkit that contains step-by-step guides for calling, writing, and meeting with members of Congress. Advocates can also find talking points there to use when engaging with members of Congress or their staff.
Posted on May 11, 2017 by Steve

From Carolinia A. Miranda, writing for the Los Angeles Times:

After President Trump threatened to eliminate the [National Endowment for the Arts], Congress approved a spending bill that not only funds the NEA for another year, but increased its $148 million annual budget by nearly $2 million. Lost in much of the acrimonious debate over whether the NEA should live or die is the organization’s support for cultural programs that cater to military veterans, active duty service members and their families.
Posted on May 11, 2017 by Steve

Joshua Heim, Arts Program Manager for the city of Bellevue, Washington, posts to AFTA’s Artsblog:

The lack of suburban arts leaders shouldn’t come as a surprise. From 2011-2015, Barry Hessenius published an annual list of the Fifty Most Powerful and Influential People in the Nonprofit Arts. Of the 142 individuals included on that list over the years, just three people came from suburbs. If you’re anxious about the steady decline in arts participation and interested in a fully integrated creative situation, then this is a problem. Because over half of Americans live and work in suburbs.
Posted on May 9, 2017 by Monica

From The New York Times:

Mayor Bill de Blasio and his lieutenants are deep into a re-examination of New York City’s $178 million arts budget and other cultural resources to try and give a higher profile — and perhaps more taxpayer money — to smaller institutions in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

The proposed new approach, with an emphasis on greater equity, has some major arts organizations fearful they will end up with less of the municipal-funding pie, while more marginalized groups are hopeful about finally receiving more.