Arts and Aging

As arts audiences grow older, there is increasing demand for quality arts programming for older adults. In partnership with Grantmakers in Aging and Grantmakers in Health, Grantmakers in the Arts has been involved in the growing movement for arts and aging. In 2011, GIA hosted a Thought Leader Forum on Arts and Aging, which brought together frontrunners in funding health, wellness, and the arts and aging fields with arts and aging practitioners, researchers, and other experts to explore their common ground and the benefits of working together.

February 15, 2012 by admin
There is no doubt that the face of art and culture in the United States is changing. Read More...
January 3, 2012 by admin
December 2011, 38 pages. National Endowment for the Arts, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20506, (202) 682-5400, www.ars.gov Download:    The Arts and Human Development (2.4Mb) Overview Read More...
August 9, 2011 by admin
2011, 397 pages, Bloomsbury USA, New York, NY Read More...
June 30, 2011 by admin
2011, 138 pages, © Trustees of Teachers College Columbia University / Research Center for Arts and Culture, 525 West 120th Street, Box 78 · New York NY 10027 · 212.678.8184 · rcac@columbia.edu Download: Read More...
April 15, 2011 by admin
116 pages, May 2012. Partners for Livable Communities, 1429 21st Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 887-5990 www.livable.org. Download: Read More...
February 28, 2011 by admin
2011, 104 pages, National Endowment for the Arts, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20506, http://www.nea.gov Download: Read More...
February 8, 2011 by admin
The Grantmakers in Arts, Grantmakers in Aging Regional Issues Forum was held on January 27, 2011. Below are the Speaker PowerPoint presentations as well as links to research mentioned throughout the day. Presenter Powerpoints: Keynote Ken Golden, Kenneth A. Picerne Foundation Tim Carpenter, EngAGE Read More...
October 18, 2008 by admin
America is graying. In just two years, the United States will have as many people over the age of 65 as there are under the age of 20. Challenges and opportunities abound in this demographic sea change. In response to this coming shift, a new paradigm articulates the idea of seeing older people for their potential rather than their problems. Arts and creativity programs provided by and for older adults are fast becoming accepted for their health, morale, and social benefits. Read More...