Support for Individual Artists

August 31, 2001 by admin
José Brown died in Portland, Oregon on May 1, 1996, of AIDS. He was a professional dancer, choreographer, and teacher. He attended Reed College for two years then transferred to the California Institute of the Arts where he majored in dance. He has danced in the New York companies of Pearl Lang, Kei Takei's “Moving Earth,” and Rudy Perez and Rael Lamb's Dance for a New World. As director of his own company, “Changing Dance Theatre,” he choreographed and performed in New York, Japan, Denmark, Spain, Italy, and Greece. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
Although most grantmakers get involved in program development, it is rare to have the chance to build an entire foundation giving program from the ground up. However, that was exactly the challenge Olga Garay encountered three years ago as the first program director for the arts hired by the newly established Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF). The New York-based foundation was created in 1996 as part of Ms. Duke's estate, whose family wealth came from her father's tobacco company and Duke Power. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
When we initiated an artist award program at The Durfee Foundation a few years ago, we decided to use financial need as one of several criteria for support. Durfee is a relatively small family foundation, and the trustees feel strongly that the foundation's modest resources should be applied where they will make the most difference. This is true across the board at the foundation, not only in the arts, but in our other programs as well. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
2000, CD-ROM, The McKnight Foundation, 600 TCF Tower, 121 South Eighth Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402, (612) 333-4220. This CD-ROM contains the results of The McKnight Foundation's recent study, the Cost of Culture, which polled 405 Minnesota artists about their economic and creative well-being. In 1996 the Foundation reported on the state of the arts in Minnesota, and now, as board chair Noa Staryk stated, "we felt it was time to take a closer look at the condition of individual artists." Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
2000, 218 pages; Northeastern University Press, (Boston, Massachusetts). Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
Working paper writer, Mindy Levine; convening curator, Heather Hitchens August 2000, 24 pages, Arts International. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
2000, 46 pages. The McKnight Foundation, 600 TCF Tower, 121 South Eighth Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402, (612) 333-4220. This monograph celebrates poet Robert Bly with photographs, essays by friends and colleagues, and Bly's own poems. The Distinguished Artist Award, now in its third year, recognizes and celebrates Minnesota artists who have founded and/or strengthened Minnesota's arts organizations, mentored and inspired younger artists, and attracted audiences and patrons who enable art to survive. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
The Potrero Nuevo Fund is a donor-advised fund housed at the Tides Foundation in San Francisco. Established about five years ago by Bill Laven and Christine Pielenz, the Fund supports projects in the arts, the environment, and sustainable architecture. While the Fund's giving to environmental and sustainable architecture projects is international in scope, the arts giving is focused on the Bay Area, and primarily on individuals and arts education. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
Co-sponsored by the Estate Project for Artists with AIDS and the National Association of Artists Organizations, Friday, October 13, 2000, the Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, California Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
The following article is based on notes for a talk presented in June 2000 at Dance/USA's bi-annual conference, "New Directions in Moving Ground." Marda Kirn participated on a panel subtitled "Nurturing the Art of Creation" that invited panelists to talk about inventive ways that artists find time, space, and support to create new work. Many years ago, I wanted to write a grant application to the NEA — as a kind of joke, and a kind of plea. I'd call it the Rip Van Winkle project. Read More...