Philanthropic practice

May 31, 2001 by admin
This piece was first published in the newsletter of the Grantmaker's Evaluation Network, Volume 9/Number 1, Winter 2001. It is published here with permission from Doug Easterling. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
2000, 18 pages, Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), 45 East Seventh Street, Saint Paul, Minnesota 55101, (651) 290-1262. Minnesota Public Radio, as a collaboration between its Civic Journalism Initiative and the program Sound Money, brought together more than 100 individuals, ranging from leading thinkers in the philanthropic field to new Microsoft millionaires, last September for a day-long summit to explore what it thought would be interesting fodder for discussion: the untapped giving potential in the United States. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
Cultural Policy Research was the topic of two breakfast roundtables at GIA's 2000 conference in Minneapolis. A combination of scheduled presenters and other participants gave brief summaries of current research underway. The cumulative impact of hearing about so many projects at the same time inspired Reader editors to want to share the reports with our readers. This overview does not pretend to be exhaustive, but rather is a snapshot based on roundtable participation and the ability of the following report contributors to respond quickly to our invitation. We extend many thanks to them. Read More...
January 31, 2001 by admin
This paper was originally given at the 1987 Conference on Private Philanthropy and the Social Good. It was brought to our attention by a GIA member, and is reprinted here with permission from Cambridge University Press and the estate of Michael Hooker. © 1987 Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation. Read More...
September 30, 2000 by admin
GIA is pleased to announce the publication of Creative Family Giving in the Arts, the second volume in its series of Field Resource Books. The book portrays a variety of innovative programs of support for the arts and artists, and emphasizes giving by small family foundations and programs that make grants under $10,000. The project was co-chaired by Kathleen O'Grady of the O'Grady Foundation and Mercy Pavelic' of the Heathcote Art Foundation. Read More...
September 30, 2000 by admin
Policy Perspectives for Individuals, Institutions, and Communities Edited by Gigi Bradford, Michael Gary, and Glenn Wallach2000, 364 pages, $18.95 paper. The New Press, New York. Read More...
May 31, 2000 by admin
1999, 23 pages. Final report of collaborative research project, Millennium Communications Group, Inc., 58 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 01810. Although its main focus seems to be on exploring ways of expanding philanthropy among new donors, Philanthropy's Current and New Stakeholders: Building a Common Vision for an Expanded Future also offers some interesting — and disturbing — observations on how traditional philanthropy is viewed. Read More...
May 31, 2000 by admin
A recently released study of giving in Hawai'i confirms what many culture and arts groups in the state already know — it's hard to raise money! A local firm, SMS Research, conducted the study for Hawai'i Community Foundation in spring 1999. Titled Hawai'i Giving Study 1999, the study's purpose was to better understand charitable giving among Hawai'i residents. Read More...
May 31, 2000 by admin
How can the arts promote positive social change? That's what the staff and board of the Kentucky Foundation for Women wanted to find out. We thought we knew. Or at least we thought we had a pretty good idea. After all, our mission is to promote positive social change through varied feminist expression in the arts, and we have been around for fifteen years. Read More...
May 31, 2000 by admin
A growing chorus of complaint has emerged about foundation giving in recent years. According to critics, foundations do not distribute enough in grant payments to justify their privileged position. On average, foundations pay out about 5.5 percent of their total assets each year and many critics believe that is just not enough. Read More...