Philanthropic practice

September 1, 2003 by admin
2003, 52 pages. Fund for Folk Culture, P.O. Box 1566, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1566, 505-984-2534, www.folkculture.org; Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington DC 20037, 202-833-7200, www.urban.org. Download: Read More...
August 26, 2003 by admin
What follows are excerpts from a lecture that W. McNeil Lowry gave at Brandeis University on December 10, 1962 when he was director of the Ford Foundation's Program in the Humanities and the Arts. GIA member Ben Cameron called the speech to our attention, noting that it continues to have relevance today. The date, 1962, is important to keep in mind when reading Lowry's talk: the National Council on Community Foundations was renamed the Council on Foundations in 1964; the National Endowment for the Arts was established in 1965. Read More...
July 31, 2003 by admin
At the GIA conference in fall, 2002, we hosted a round table discussion with the euphemistic title "Adapting in a Time of Constraints." Essentially its burden was to ask: what should we, as funders, be doing for the cultural institutions with whom we work in the context of these extraordinarily difficult times? Read More...
July 31, 2003 by admin
Editors of the Reader invited GIA's research advisors to reflect on challenges facing arts grantmakers in light of current research findings on arts funding trends. What do recent research findings suggest about the prospect for the support of arts and culture in the years ahead? Ed Pauly: After a decade of dramatic growth in foundations' support for the arts, the funding news is now somber. Yet the meaning we make from the most recent study of foundation funding for the arts depends, as always, on the perspective we choose. Read More...
July 31, 2003 by admin
Recently, several studies of arts funding have been conducted in specific cities and regions. We report on a few of these here. In the winter 2002 issue of the GIA Reader Vol. 13, No. 1, Lisa Cremin and Kathie de Nobriga reported on a comparative study of arts funding in Atlanta and nineteen other cities. The report was both an inspiring and a cautionary tale for Ann McQueen and others in Boston as they planned the study that Cindy Gehrig reviews below. Read More...
July 31, 2003 by admin
Booms and Busts From the depths of our economic trough it is hard to look ahead, clear-eyed, and to see where U.S. foundations are headed. But consider, for a moment, where we have been. We have experienced an era in which: : • New scientific and technological advances captured the popular imagination. • These innovations promised a huge jump in economic productivity. • There was talk about a new economy replacing an old economy. • Many business corporations were consolidated and reorganized. Read More...
July 31, 2003 by admin
Arts Funding IV examines recent changes in arts grantmaking by one segment of private institutional donors — private and community foundations. While the larger, more fragmented arena of government and private support lies outside this investigation, it is nonetheless useful to place foundation support within this larger context. The following overview outlines the basic framework of private and public arts funding in the U.S. and discusses funding in relation to the overall financing of nonprofit arts groups. Read More...
May 31, 2003 by admin
The Fund for Folk Culture, based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, has initiated a series of gatherings, supported by a grant from the NEA, to examine topics relevant to folk arts and traditional culture. The first of those meetings was held in its home town at the Wheelwright Museum on March 13 and 14 to discuss the needs and concerns of individual artists in the folk and traditional arts field. Read More...
May 31, 2003 by admin
2001, 36 pages. Alliance for the Arts, 330 West 42nd Street, Suite 1701, New York, NY 10036, 212-947-6340 Who Pays for the Arts? is a fascinating analysis of funding trends for 575 cultural institutions in New York City from 1995-1999. Although charts, graphs, and statistics fill the study, the information they present is explained clearly and simply. Read More...
May 31, 2003 by admin
Federal Support for Historic Preservation Fund on Downward Trajectory In his fiscal year 2004 budget, President Bush proposed $67 million for the Historic Preservation Fund. The Fund is authorized at $150 million, but historically the Congress and Administration have provided in appropriations just one third of the authorized amount. Read More...