Foundation management

November 22, 2009 by Steve
I have visited groups of GIA members and nonmembers in every region of the country this year, from Boston to Los Angeles and Atlanta to Seattle. It has been an interesting first year as executive director of GIA, to say the very least. What I have observed is that grantmakers have not taken a “recess” during this challenging time. In many ways, for private and community foundations especially, there could have been a pulling away from grantees, a kind of “we can’t help you” attitude. Read More...
November 19, 2009 by Steve
As funders we have three main challenges: first, getting a handle on the extent and impact of the recession; second, exerting leadership — being bold, positive, and opportunistic without being insensitive; and third — and most important — asking ourselves the same tough questions that we are asking grantees: how do we slip the vice-like grip of old mindsets and behaviors and adapt so we increase our relevance, resilience, and meaningful contributions to our community?  — Foundation President Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
In late January GIA polled its 309 member organizations about their organization's responses to the economic downturn. 117 (38%) members responded, which provides a healthy sample of the membership. Members reported their expected 2009 arts grantmaking would likely compare to 2008 as follows: 41% expected that 2009 would be the same as 2008. 13% expected that it would be reduced to 90% of 2008. 12% expected that it would be reduced to 80% of 2008. 11% expected that it would be reduced to 70% of 2008. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
Grantees of foundations have little control over which program officer takes their case. Yet program officers make or break grantees' experiences with foundations. To trigger social change, foundations must give program officers better training, clearer expectations, and regular performance feedback. Free online from Standford Social innovation Review Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
Foundations think they're doing the right thing by requiring grantees to form partnerships with each other. There are, however, two sides to every story, and grantees share their stories of frustration here. Free online from the Stanford Social Innovation Review. Download: Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
Like well-meaning rich aunts, foundations are full of advice for nonprofit organizations and their leaders. From positions of relative financial security and isolated from the risks and challenges confronting most nonprofit executive directors, foundation leaders and program officers issue a constant stream of admonitions: Focus on finding dependable sources of income. Produce measurable results. Evaluate whether you are making a difference. Be strategic, not opportunistic. Build diverse boards. Spend more time on advocacy. Collaborate with other organizations. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
First Nations Development Institute and Native Americans in Philanthropy convened a group of Native philanthropic leaders in Minneapolis/St. Paul on September 14 2005, to discuss how we can better support the development of Native foundations and Native philanthropy. The objective of this meeting was to provide insight and input into the design and implementation of a structure to support the further development of Native foundations and Native philanthropy through technical assistance, advocacy and research. Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
This book features profiles of 18 family foundations and giving groups that have developed unique or noteworthy programs of arts giving, reflecting the values and character of the donors in a variety of ways. Interviews with principals and trustees from each foundation provide further insights to how these programs were developed and realized. 90 pages, perfect bound ISBN 0-9705157-4-X Read More...
November 12, 2009 by Steve
This Field Resource Book profiles nine foundations that provide general operating support to arts organizations. The featured foundations reflect geographic and institutional diversity, as well as myriad grantmaking approaches. The chapters are the result of research and interviews with senior staff at each of the nine foundations. Each chapter includes six sections: Read More...