PRECONFERENCE: ACCESS TO A LIFETIME OF ARTS EDUCATION
Tina LaPadula, Teaching Artist, and formerly Education Director, Arts Corps
At this year’s GIA Conference, grantmakers supporting arts education and those interested in art programs for older adults are encouraged to attend the Sunday preconference, Access to a Lifetime of Arts Education: Every Child, Every Adult. In the morning workshop session, funders will learn how social justice practices can be integrated into teaching artist trainings and program implementation to ensure equity in teacher-student engagement.
Posted on March 18, 2016 by Monica

Tom Rothman, chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment’s Motion Picture Group, a GIA member and funding partner, was appointed by President Obama and has been confirmed by the United States Senate as a member of the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Posted on March 17, 2016 by Monica

By Robert Viagas, writing for Playbill:

Responding to a January 2015 report that highlighted a lack of racial diversity in New York arts groups, New York City announced March 16 that it has allocated $2 million to the city's theatre groups to support "a more inclusive theatre community."
Posted on March 16, 2016 by Steve

The Winter 2016 edition of the GIA Reader is now available from our online library. You will find our annual snapshot of arts and culture funding data from Foundation Center, plus a report from The Summit on Creativity and Aging in America, and articles on Building Equity in the Arts, Crowdsourcing Cultural Policy, the field of Teaching Artists, Arlene Goldbard on The U.S. Department of Arts and Culture, and more.

See the full issue here.

Posted on March 15, 2016 by Monica

The National League of Cities has released a new report examining the maker movement across major U.S. cities. How Cities Can Grow the Maker Movement summarizes the characteristics of the maker movement, how the movement has grown, how local governments have been involved, and the challenges faced. The report also makes recommendations on how city policymakers can support the movement locally.

Posted on March 14, 2016 by Steve

From John McGuirk, announcing the release of a report, “Moving Arts Leadership Forward: A Changing Landscape” on The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation blog:

At the heart of the findings is a challenged definition of “leadership.” Members of younger generations often see leadership as the fostering of a culture of connectedness, collaboration, and change—they believe leadership is rooted in the efforts of many. This view is in contrast to the more traditional, hierarchical structures and practices of many arts organizations and funders.
Posted on March 9, 2016 by Monica

A new report released by A+ Denver examines the progress of a $40 million investment to improve arts education in Denver Public Schools. A Retrospective on Arts Education in Denver evaluates DPS progress in nine areas – including curriculum development, student assessment, and equitable access to quality programs – and makes recommendations for the future.

Posted on March 8, 2016 by Monica

From the office of Senator Tom Udall (D-N.M), posted to KRWG:

Today in a speech at the National Arts Summit in Washington, D.C., New Mexico Senator Tom Udall introduced the Comprehensive Resources for Entrepreneurs in the Arts to Transform the Economy (CREATE) Act. The new bill intends to support individual artists, arts institutions, and communities by reducing economic barriers and recognizing the powerful role of the arts in the U.S. economy.
Posted on March 7, 2016 by Steve

By Shawn Lent, Katie Ingersoll, Michael Feldman and Talia Gibas, posted to Createquity:

Opinions about the nonprofit arts model — the fundamental legal and business structure in which arts nonprofits in the United States work — are as numerous and varied as 501(c)(3)s themselves… While that system may seem “fossilized” to some, the truth is that most arts nonprofits today are younger than most of our parents. The boom of arts nonprofits has been a relatively recent phenomenon, and it came about thanks in large part to a handful of individuals who intentionally put it into motion.
Posted on March 7, 2016 by Steve

From Doug Borwick, posted to his blog Engaging Matters:

2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the start of The Arts in the Small Community project led by Robert E. Gard, and we invite you to celebrate with us! Robert E. Gard was a visionary in the field of community arts. While many people in the 1940’s and beyond were talking about “access” to the arts for people, typically, that meant that Everyman should be in the audience or the gallery to witness America’s finest artists.
Posted on March 7, 2016 by Steve

From Tricia Tongco, Social Media Editor for Arts & Culture at The Huffington Post:

Since 1985, the Guerrilla Girls have been raising a much-needed ruckus over gender and racial inequality in the art world, under the leadership of seven anonymous, masked women. For over 30 years, they've publicly condemned museums that fail to collect or showcase women artists and artists of color, using facts, humor and "outrageous visuals." After decades of work, they show no signs of stopping.
Posted on March 4, 2016 by Steve

The National Performance Network, including the Visual Artists Network (NPN/VAN), has named Caitlin Strokosch as its new President and CEO. Strokosch will assume responsibilities in July 2016 and will succeed MK Wegmann, who is retiring after 15 years of leading NPN/VAN. She is currently executive director of the Alliance of Artists Communities and serves on the GIA Board of Directors.

Strokosch has served the Alliance of Artists Communities, ­­an international association of artist residency programs since 2002, and was named executive director of the organization in 2008. Her selection comes after an national search that generated a pool of qualified candidates.

Posted on March 3, 2016 by Steve

The 2015 Otis Report on the Creative Economy of the Los Angeles Region, is now available online. The annual report is prepared for Otis College of Art and Design by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, a lobbying organization funded by LA businesses.

Posted on March 1, 2016 by SuJ'n

For the month of March 2016, GIA’s photo banner features art and projects supported by the Robert B. McMillen Foundation. The Foundation is a unique, private family foundation whose office is nestled in the heart of the Cascade Range in Washington State. Small but mighty, it is a statewide organization focused on medical research and the arts, with particular emphasis on supporting working artists and the arts as an economic driver to create vibrant communities.

Posted on February 28, 2016 by Steve

The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced a new grant program to strengthen and sustain quality humanities programs that benefit youth, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged populations. Humanities Access Grants offer matching grants toward term endowments for programming at cultural institutions that broadens access to excellent humanities content for underserved groups.

Posted on February 28, 2016 by Steve

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is conducting a survey of US-based artists to better understand their needs related to careers, income, health, and overall well-being. The survey is live now and through March 15th. It takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

Posted on February 25, 2016 by Steve

A new website aims to assert the essential role of arts and cultural organizations in rural economic and community development. Next Generation: The Future of Arts & Culture Placemaking in Rural America — the full title of a “digital learning commons” announced by Art of the Rural (AOTR) and the Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI) — is designed to provide a platform for storytelling, research, and best practices as well as an inclusive space for deeper collaboration. The Learning Commons wants to address two major challenges facing rural arts practitioners — geographic distance and access to information and networks — and establishes a digital intermediary through which these partnerships can develop.

Posted on February 24, 2016 by Steve

Theatre Communications Group (TCG) has announced the launch of the Rising Leaders of Color (RLC) Program and is taking nominations for participants to a DC-area cohort. RLC is an expansion and re-envisioning of TCG’s Young Leaders of Color Program that was launched in 2008. The program will work to change the face of the theatre field by nurturing and supporting an intergenerational network of leaders of color at various stages in their careers.

Posted on February 24, 2016 by Steve

The National Center for Creative Aging (NCCA) convened national leaders and advocates, master teaching artists and researchers for the regional launch of the NCCA Creative Caregiving Guide on February 23 in Los Angeles, California. The guide is a web-based and community-shared resource specially designed for both family and professional caregivers of adults who live with Alzheimer's disease and related cognitive disorders.

Posted on February 23, 2016 by Steve

The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) has published the results of a survey examining the diversity of staff and leadership at nonprofit cultural organizations that are funded by the city. The survey release marks a major milestone in DCLA’s initiative to promote and cultivate diversity in the cultural community. The survey found that while New York City’s cultural sector is far more diverse than cultural organizations on the national level, it lags behind the demographic diversity of the city’s population.

Posted on February 20, 2016 by Steve

From Sherry Lucas, writing for The Clarion-Ledger:

Malcolm White’s return to the helm of the Mississippi Arts Commission is a “back to the future” move, in his words. “I’m stoked about it,” he said of going back to the post of executive director of the state arts agency, a job he previously held 2005-2012. “It feels like going back home.” But with value added. Three years as the state’s tourism chief means he’ll come packing a chunk of new knowledge, know-how, contacts.
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