OCTOBER SPOTLIGHT ON HOUSTON ENDOWMENT

For the month of October, GIA’s photo banner features a selection of artists and projects funded by Houston Endowment. Houston Endowment is the Anchor Sponsor for the annual GIA 2014 Conference happening this month. Learn more about the foundation here.

Posted on August 21, 2014 by Steve

John M. Eger, blogging on Huffington Post:

This week San Diego State University is launching a Music Entrepreneurship and Business Degree Program, which, according to the university, “is believed to be the first of its kind in the country.” Developed as a partnership between SDSU’s College of Professional Studies and Fine Arts and the College of Business Administration, the program embeds 15 units of entrepreneurship classes ranging from the Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship to Creativity and Innovation, Social Entrepreneurship and Entrepreneurial Finance, in addition to business course electives.
Posted on August 21, 2014 by Steve

From Mike Boehm at the Los Angeles Times:

Among the decisions voters will face on the Nov. 4 ballot (in L.A. County) is whether to absorb $23 in annual per-parcel property taxes over the next 30 years for improvements to parks and cultural facilities within them as well as recreational facilities, beaches and wildlife areas. If the required two-thirds supermajority says yes, the county would have $53 million each year to spend for all those purposes combined. In L.A. County, most of the key publicly owned or funded arts venues are in county, municipal or state parks, all of which would be eligible for the funding.
Posted on August 21, 2014 by Steve

From Suzy Evans at Theatre Communications Group:

With the closing of the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program earlier this year, the O’Neill is now one of the only professional-development avenues for working critics. Some entities — like the Goodman Theatre, which has a young critics’ program for girls, and the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival, whose winners are given spots at the O’Neill — host education-based initiatives for aspiring journalists.
Posted on August 20, 2014 by Steve

From Heather Hurlburt, Mark Schmitt, and Steven Teles, writing for Philanthropy News Digest:

Institutional philanthropy, by law and by tradition, has had an indirect and often awkward connection to the policy process. For the most part, foundations don’t lobby directly for legislation, and they are prohibited from engaging in the kind of political activity — such as campaign spending — that gives other players leverage in policy making. Instead, leaders in philanthropy have pursued a vision of social change that rests on a set of long-held assumptions: that strong ideas and persuasive research, coupled with broad public support and validation by elites, will motivate elected officials; that policy proposals designed to reflect the ideological preferences of both major parties, or the poll-tested preferences of centrist voters, can provide a basis for insider bargaining; and that policy entrepreneurs who operate both inside and outside legislative bodies can act as advocates, sources of ideas and information, and mediators.
Posted on August 19, 2014 by SuJ'n

Last month, Helicon Collaborative published Making Meaningful Connections: Characteristics of Arts Groups that Engage New and Diverse Participants with funding from The James Irvine Foundation. This research shares the attributes of organizations that successfully invite, reach, and meet the needs of diverse audiences. On its heels, the Regional Arts & Culture Council based in Portland, Oregon recently published An Introduction to Engaging Diverse Audiences. This toolkit presents six building blocks that build and strengthen community relationships and provides an excellent compilation of other previously released resources, including the Helicon report.

Posted on August 17, 2014 by Steve

From Craig Watson, Director, California Arts Council, blogging for Art Works Blog:

The California Arts Council received quite the Valentine’s Day surprise from one of its fellow state agencies last February. The head of rehabilitation programs for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) called with a proposal: help coordinate an 18-month, $2.5 million Arts-in-Corrections pilot program in California state prisons. CDCR would provide the funding, and the Arts Council would provide the know-how and coordination. Like most Valentine’s Day proposals, CDCR’s was happily accepted.
Posted on August 13, 2014 by Steve

How do in-school arts education programs affect student creativity, academics, or social outcomes? On Wednesday, August 27, join researchers from the Kennedy Center and Johns Hopkins University as they share their investigation of these topics. Ivonne Chand O'Neal is director of research and evaluation at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and she will share her study on the Changing Education Through the Arts (CETA) program on Washington DC-area public school students. Mariale Hardiman, professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education and former principal of Roland Park Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore, Maryland, will discuss her work at the intersection of cognitive research and effective teaching strategies.

Posted on August 13, 2014 by Steve

The Independent Sector National Conference will take place in Seattle November 16-18, 2014. Independent Sector is offering conference discounts of up to $280 for the Grantmakers in the Arts members. To affect the discount rates you only have to apply the discounts code(s) at the end of the registration process.

Posted on August 12, 2014 by Steve

An opinion piece from Grant Oliphant, at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette:

Every time I hear someone describe the proposal to hand the August Wilson Center over to private hotel developers as a “win-win,” I think of that famous line from the Vietnam War: “We had to destroy the village in order to save it.”

Just to be clear, there is nothing “win-win” about this proposal, to the extent we know anything about it beyond vague outlines and promises. Here is what I believe we can safely say:

Posted on August 10, 2014 by Steve

From Tom Mayhall Rastrelli, writing for the Statesman Journal, Salem, Oregon:

Brian Rogers, the new executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust, has been on a whirlwind ride since his arrival from Austin, Texas, one month ago. He’s been traveling the I-5 corridor between his Portland and Salem offices. He’s becoming acquainted with state, business, educational and nonprofit leaders in Oregon’s arts and culture community.
Posted on August 8, 2014 by Janet

By Janet Brown from her blog Better Together:

Over the past few years, Grantmakers in the Arts has identified four content areas that reflect core values and are the basis for much of our work. They are:

  • Arts education
  • Racial equity in philanthropy
  • Financial health of the nonprofit arts sector (capitalization)
  • Support for individual artists
Posted on August 7, 2014 by Steve

The Center for Cultural Innovation announced last month that Angie Kim will serve as Interim President and CEO as of July 15, 2014. Kim transitions to this position from her current role as Board Chair, and she will succeed Cora Mirikitani. Kim joined the CCI Board in 2009 and was elected Chair in 2010. She was Director of Programs at Southern California Grantmakers, where she served networking, knowledge, and public policy needs of independent, family, community, corporate, and operating foundations.

Posted on August 7, 2014 by Steve

The National Endowment for the Arts has announced the latest Research: Art Works funding opportunity. This program supports research for projects that investigate the value and/or impact of the arts on individuals and communities. To assist potential applicants, the NEA will hold a grant guidelines webinar on September 3, 2014 at 3:00 PM ET. To join the webinar, you must register in advance. The NEA is interested in value-oriented research that will measure or clarify one or more factors, characteristics, and conditions of the U.S. arts ecosystem, as well as impact-oriented research that will investigate the direct and indirect benefits of arts participation on health and well-being, cognitive capacity, learning, creativity, community livability, or economic prosperity.

Posted on August 7, 2014 by Steve

The National Network of Consultants to Grantmakers is looking for a new Project Director to work with a dedicated group of volunteer members to continue growing the organization and serving the organization’s mission. The project director will work with members and a virtual office staff to:

  • Expand the visibility and use of our Directory of Consultants as a vital resource to grantmakers
  • Achieve organizational growth by increasing membership, creating business partnerships and successful grant funding
  • Assist the professional consultant members in developing thought leadership via programs and networking
  • Work with a part-time administrative team (contracted firm) to manage routine financial processing and routine communications
Posted on August 6, 2014 by Steve

By Kinsee Morlan, at San Diego City Beat:

San Diego County’s approach to funding arts organizations is unusual, and some question whether it’s fair and yields the best results. Naturally, many arts advocates would prefer a process under which county funds are set aside specifically for the arts and then administered by an arts oversight panel designated by the county Board of Supervisors. That panel, often called an arts council, would be recognized by the California Arts Council through the State-Local Partnership Program, which provides modest annual funding and assistance.
Posted on August 6, 2014 by Tommer

The American Music Project is a nonprofit foundation that hopes to put a brighter spotlight on the American repertory, old and new, and to commission new works. “The goal of the foundation,” Mr. Johnson said in a statement, “is to facilitate more performances of our great musical legacy, as well as to raise awareness and, ultimately, help increase the amount of American music that is performed regularly in our concert halls and opera houses.”

Posted on August 1, 2014 by Steve

The Creative Work Fund is celebrating its 20th anniversary on September 1, 2014. The fund has announced the awarding of 13 grants totaling $518,000 to literary and performing artists throughout California’s Bay Area to create new works through collaborations with nonprofit organizations. The 2014 grantees, each receiving grants ranging from $30,000-$40,000, will create poetry installations, interactive websites, music, theatrical and dance performances, as well as books and multi-disciplinary works.

Posted on August 1, 2014 by Steve

Ernest Tollerson will serve as interim CEO at The Nathan Cummings Foundation, according to the foundation’s board chair Adam Cummings. He will formally begin his work with the Foundation on Monday, August 4. The board will launch a search for a permanent CEO later this year.

Posted on August 1, 2014 by Steve

From Emilia David, writing for DNAinfo New York:

More than 53,000 artists have applied for one of just 89 new units of subsidized living and working space in a former public school on E. 99th Street, organizers announced. Developers for the space, known as El Barrio’s Artspace PS 109 and located between Second and Third avenues, fielded 51,313 online applications via a city website by the July 14 deadline, officials said. That’s on top of more than 2,000 paper applications filed.
Posted on July 31, 2014 by Steve

Bill O'Brien, NEA Senior Adviser for Program Innovation, reports from the Santa Fe Institute:

Sunil Iyengar (NEA Director of Research and Analysis) and I had the privilege of attending a Nature of Creativity in the Brain working group at the Santa Fe Institute earlier this month. We co-organized the event with Jennifer Dunn, the Institute’s faculty chair. The purpose of the meeting was to “evaluate the legacy of creativity research and to look for ways to mine new knowledge at the intersections of cognitive psychology, neurobiology, neurotechnology, learning, and the arts.”
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