Cultural Policy

August 31, 2001 by admin
Are Oregonians in danger of losing their cultural assets and identity? Kim Stafford [special advisor to the Joint Interim Task Force on Cultural Development] fears we are, "For Oregon is beautiful, and fragile, and her people live deep in cultural heritage that could soon be gone. We preserve wilderness in the high country; we make laws to preserve farmland; we brag about the beauty of Oregon. But how do we save our cultural identity before we become a faceless port in a global economy? Read More...
August 31, 2001 by admin
May 2000, 92 pages. Council of Europe Publishing; U.S. sales agent: Manhattan Publishing Co., 468 Albany Post Road, Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520, 914-271-5194. The future seems to me no unified dream but a mince pie, long in the baking... -E.B. White It's broccoli, dear. I say it's spinach, and I say the hell with it. -Caption for a New Yorker cartoon by Carl Rose Read More...
August 31, 2001 by admin
The Culture of Marketing, the Marketing of Culture by John Seabrook2000, 215 pages, Alfred A. Knopf American Culture, American Tastes Social Change and the Twentieth Century by Michael Kammen1999, 320 pages, Basic Books Read More...
August 31, 2001 by admin
2001, 166 pages. National Arts Journalism Program, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Read More...
August 31, 2001 by admin
The cultural landscape of Maine is as rich and diverse as its natural landscape, although it is less well known. Recent initiatives have brought attention to the arts and culture of this rural state that is home to 1.4 million residents and covers two million acres, 2,000 miles of rugged (and increasingly developed) shoreline, and a vast area of working forest, farms, and urban settings not unlike its northern NewEngland neighbors. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
The Minnesota Regional Arts Councils (RACs) system is one of a kind. Established in 1977 by the Minnesota State Legislature, the Regional Arts Councils work in partnership with the Minnesota State Arts Board to share responsibility for equitably distributing legislative arts funding throughout the state. The result of this system is decentralized decision- making for providing arts grants, establishing programs, and providing services. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
Arts in Education Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
The following is a short excerpt from a chapter in a new book, Crossroads: Art and Religion in American Life (see "Digest" entry, page 36). The complete essay examines the history of art and religion in this country from the debates of eighteenth-century philosophers through the attitudes of contemporary artists. This excerpt describes only the first few phases in the relationship between the two. It is published here with permission of the author, Neil Harris, and of the Henry Luce Foundation. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
The Center for Arts and Culture, an independent think tank on cultural policy, began work on its Art, Culture and the National Agenda project in 2000. Scholars, artists, and practitioners from around the country were commissioned to write background papers on the most pressing concerns facing the cultural sector. With nearly 100 papers submitted to the project, the Center's board, research advisory council, and staff, in discussion with leading policymakers, crafted a set of four structural recommendations for the federal government. Read More...