Community Arts

July 31, 2002 by admin
The summer 2002 issue of the Reader opened with "The Pace of Thoughts" by Rebecca Solnit, a piece about walking — its slowness and its affinity with thinking. Some kinds of understanding simply require slowing down, or as Helen De Michiel said in conversation recently, “Sometimes you have to slow down to speed up.” Her comment made an agricultural reference to the kind of slow, deep watering that ultimately can invigorate, even speed up, a plant's growth. Read More...
July 29, 2002 by admin
Bess Lomax Hawes first presented “Yeast to Make the Bread Rise” in October 1999 as a keynote address at the Children’s Music Network (CMN) National Gathering in Petaluma, California. In response to enthusiasm from its members, CMN subsequently published the essay in Pass It On! in the fall 2000. The essay is published here with permission from both Hawes and CMN. Read More...
June 30, 2002 by admin
April 17-21, 2002, Lexington, Kentucky • A bilingual play brings together migrant workers and immigrant rights activists in a pointed comedy portraying communications and miscommunications among Anglos and Spanish-speaking peoples living in and working in one community today. • An African American theater company performs a rollicking — but serious — romp through the cultural changes from Motown to hip-hop, from soul food to vegan, from post-60s to post-modern America. Read More...
June 30, 2002 by admin
The Rhode Island Foundation, founded in 1916, is one of the oldest and largest community foundations in the United States. It is also one of a small number of statewide community foundations. In 2000, the Foundation's assets exceeded $400 million. RIF's grantmaking areas are children & families, economic/community development, education, and arts. The arts grantmaking area has several program foci. Read More...
April 30, 2002 by admin
On November 12, 2000, a headline on the front page of the Atlanta Journal/Constitution read, "Study finds Atlanta arts community trailing peers." A full-page story in Section A followed. This one headline challenged the city's cherished self-assessment as "cultural jewel of the South" and quietly affirmed the suspicions of many of its artists and cultural workers. This is the story about the headline, the study, and the volunteer efforts of an incorporated ad hoc group that calls itself the Atlanta Arts Think Tank and that commissioned the landmark study. Read More...
August 31, 2001 by admin
The cultural landscape of Maine is as rich and diverse as its natural landscape, although it is less well known. Recent initiatives have brought attention to the arts and culture of this rural state that is home to 1.4 million residents and covers two million acres, 2,000 miles of rugged (and increasingly developed) shoreline, and a vast area of working forest, farms, and urban settings not unlike its northern NewEngland neighbors. Read More...
May 31, 2001 by admin
The Minnesota Regional Arts Councils (RACs) system is one of a kind. Established in 1977 by the Minnesota State Legislature, the Regional Arts Councils work in partnership with the Minnesota State Arts Board to share responsibility for equitably distributing legislative arts funding throughout the state. The result of this system is decentralized decision- making for providing arts grants, establishing programs, and providing services. Read More...
September 30, 2000 by admin
Founded in 1947, the Los Angeles County Arts Commission is a unit of county government housed within the executive office of the county board of supervisors. Each of the five supervisors appoints three commissioners who advise the board on issues of governance, policy, and funding allocation. For fiscal year 2000-2001, the total budget of the Commission is approximately $3,815,000, reflecting a four-fold increase in only eight years. For this year, $1,902,000 has been awarded in grants to 146 organizations. Read More...
September 30, 2000 by admin
Texas is much in the news today. Its environmental record and education reforms are bandied around as political hot potatoes in this year's presidential race. So what has George W. Bush, governor of the state, done for the arts in Texas? Basically, he has kept arts funding stable in the state budget. On a more personal level, the Bushes received the first two state arts affinity license plates (Texas's arts license plates are the most popular affinity plates in the state) and have agreed to serve as co-hosts of the Texas Medal of Arts event in spring 2000. Read More...
September 30, 2000 by admin
In each issue of the Reader we intend to include at least one piece in the voice of an artist. Here we've chosen to reprint writer Irene Borger's interview with choreographer Joanna Haigood, from Force of Curiosity, Borger's interviews with past recipients of the CalArts/Alpert Award in the Arts. It is published here with Borger's permission. Read More...