Blogs

Setting a Strategic Lifespan, Quixote Foundation Spends Down its Endowment and Closes its Doors

In a recent blog post, June Wilson and Lenore Hanisch of the Quixote Foundation discuss the decision to close the foundation and spend its entire endowment:

Spending up allowed us to see clearly that our philanthropy was not about our personal, family or institutional legacy, it was about the work of our grantees and the change they work tirelessly to realize. It enabled us to embrace conflict and seek resolution. It encouraged us to approach our grantmaking strategy with a greater sense of creativity, not restriction. Knowing that we had limited time and resources, we found a clearer path that was ultimately more satisfying to us as individuals and more impactful for our organization and the field.
New from the GIA Reader: Exploring Economic Empowerment through Cultural Revitalization

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Sonia BasSheva Mañjon writes about her work with Ohio State University to investigate economic empowerment with an arts and culture lens in order to better understand the needs in rural America. Read “From Whitesburg, Kentucky, to Washington Court House, Ohio: An Academic Explores Economic Empowerment through Cultural Revitalization.”

Aroha Philanthropies Supports New Arts Education Program for Older Adults in New Hampshire

A recent article in Valley News highlights a new arts education program for older adults in New Hampshire supported by Aroha Philanthropies:

The idea behind the program’s design is based in a growing body of research that shows that “more intensive, skill-based, sequential arts learning is particularly valuable to older adults, and is shown to have a variety of health and social benefits,” Selchen said.

According to one 2006 study funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, seniors who participated in cultural programs like Experience/Arts reported better physical health and morale, and less loneliness, one year after the completion of their programs compared to control groups who did not participate in those programs.

Jason Schupbach to Leave NEA, Moves to Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

From The Architect's Newspaper:

Jason Schupbach has been selected as the new director of the Design School at Arizona State University’s (ASU) Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

Schupbach is considered one of the founding leaders of the national creative placemaking movement and will head to ASU after working as the director of design and creative placemaking programs for the National Endowment of the Arts. At the NEA, Schupbach oversees Our Town and Art Works grants, the Mayor’s Institute on City Design, the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design, as well as the NEA’s community development-related federal agency collaborations.

How NEA Funding Supports Arts and Culture in Small Town Indiana

A recent article in The Washington Post highlights how funding from the National Endowment for the Arts supports arts and culture across Indiana, including in many small towns and rural areas:

In Indiana, artists and nonprofit leaders in small towns or underserved communities fear that lawmakers don’t understand how much they depend on the millions of arts dollars distributed each year outside booming metropolises. NEA dollars give children access to the arts at a time when schools are cutting back. They provide performances for people who don’t live in cultural centers. They keep such handmade traditions as basket-weaving and quiltmaking alive.
Article Features CCI Pilot Program, Creative Industries Incentive Network

A recent article in Surface magazine highlights the work of the Center for Cultural Innovation and its pilot program, the Creative Industries Incentive Network:

This year, through a pilot program called the Creative Industries Incentive Network (CIIN)—which operates in L.A., Richmond, San Francisco, San Jose, and Santa Ana—and its Los Angeles Creative Economic Development Fund, CCI will give $100,000 in grants, each up to $12,500, to a wide range of culturally minded start-ups and various five-person-and-under ventures. [CEO Angie Kim] describes the fund, which aims to spur economic impact in L.A. through art, this way: “These are grants for artists who are pursuing an artistic practice in order to have a positive social impact, using a commercial business strategy.”
New from the GIA Reader: Lessons in Funder Collaboration

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Michele Kumi Baer of The New York Community Trust writes about the formation of and lessons learned from the New York City Cultural Agenda Fund, a collaborative fund focused on cultural policy and advocacy that was created in the wake of New York City’s last mayoral election. Read “Seizing Opportunity amid Uncertainty: Lessons in Funder Collaboration.”

Preserving the Soul of America

By Janet Brown from her blog "Better Together"

There are many arguments for continued federal funding to the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities (NEA and NEH), the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) — all agencies that would be eliminated by President Trump’s 2018 budget and crippled in his recommended 2017 budget.

Utah Division of Arts & Museums Gets New Director

From The Deseret News:

Victoria Panella Bourns has been named director of the Utah Division of Arts & Museums. She has directed the Salt Lake County Zoo Arts and Parks (ZAP) program for the past 12 years. The program distributes approximately $14 million annually to more than 170 arts and cultural organizations. Prior to joining ZAP, she assisted cultural organizations and other nonprofits with strategic planning, board development and executive searches through Panella Consulting.
New from the GIA Reader: Confronting Homogeneity in American Orchestras

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Jesse Rosen, president and CEO of the League of American Orchestras, discusses the League’s work addressing diversity in the orchestra field. “A New Will to Confront Homogeneity in American Orchestras,” presents the results of two of the League’s studies on the racial and gender demographics of the field and efforts to support inclusion of African American and Latino musicians through fellowships.