Steve's blog

New from the GIA Reader: Becoming the Agile Nonprofit

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “DataArts: Becoming the Agile Nonprofit,” Beth Tuttle, CEO of DataArts, details how the organization adapted its internal practices to the Agile framework to accelerate progress toward its strategic goals.

New from the GIA Reader: Can Art Change How We Think about Climate Change?

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Alexis Frasz, codirector of Helicon Collaborative, interviews Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

New from the GIA Reader: Arts and Environmental Sustainability Thought Leader Forum

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Alexis Frasz, codirector of Helicon Collaborative provides a summary of GIA’s Arts and Environmental Sustainability Thought Leader Forum, which brought together arts and environmental funders to discuss cross-sector work.

New from the GIA Reader: Supporting Community Arts Leadership

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “Supporting Community Arts Leadership,” William Cleveland, director of the Center for the Study of Art & Community, discusses the importance of arts-based community development.

New from the GIA Reader: Shaping a Brighter Future

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader entitled “Shaping a Brighter Future: the Canada Council Transforms for the Next Generation,” Simon Brault, director and CEO of the Canada Council for the Arts, writes about how the agency underwent institutional transformation with a new funding model and strategic plan to better serve a changing nation.

New from the GIA Reader: What Will the Future Look Like?

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader entitled “What Will the Future Look Like?: Generational Change in the Arts Sector,” Emiko Ono of The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation discusses generational differences in the arts and culture workforce, from cultural values to working styles, and their implications on the future of arts leadership.

Reflections on the Saint Paul Conference

Blogger Lara Davis posts her final thoughts on the 2016 GIA Conference:

My barometer for what makes a conference good is informed, in part, by GIAcon. The conference has a strong focus on power and privilege at the intersection of grantmaking. There are a lot of suits, but the dialog and introspection crack the veneer of professionalism, creating space for real talk, and accountability. “A Confluence of People, Cultures, and Ideas” is apt subtitling for this year’s GIAcon.

Read the full post.

New from the GIA Reader: Advancing Racial Equity

An article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “Advancing Racial Equity: Racial Equity Funders Collaborative in Minnesota”, discusses the formation and work of the Racial Equity Funders Collaborative, a group of Minnesota funders working to advance racial equity in arts philanthropy.

Offering Space, Unbound Arts and Dynamic Resources

2016 GIA Conference blogger Ebony McKinney wraps up her postings with final observations:

I can’t let go of the idea of space. It’s lingered with me since artist Barak adé Soleil brought it up at the Building Equity in Support for Individual Artists preconference. His unique perspective, that of a black, queer, cis gendered, disabled choreographer, underscored the layers of Tetris-like maneuvering he undergoes whenever attempting to cross a busy street, or other more philosophically constrained space. “What is the real way of grounding ourselves and opening the space?” he asked while advocating for both an awareness of physical space/hospitality and a “deepening complexity of identity.”

How can I become more aware of physical or language barriers to information or resources? What categories or characterizations limit expressiveness? How can I welcome work that links justice and beauty or tradition and innovation? In what ways, small and large, can I create inclusive platforms, move out of the way and support artists who then thrive?

Read the full post.

How Can We Support Artists in the New Economy?

GIA conference blogger Ebony McKinney summarizes the session Artists and the New Economy, held on Tuesday, October 18:

Alexis Frasz, of Helicon Collaborative, began by explaining that the research group which included Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI) and National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) started with a design challenge:
What are the conditions in which artists live and work today and what will it look like for them to live sustainably, create good work and contribute to their communities? Also: Where is our support system now in terms of what we think is ideal? If its not there, what would we do to adjust it?

This field-wide temperature check and list of implications resulted in Creativity Connects: Trends and Conditions Affecting US Artists, released in September 2016, with support from Surdna Foundation and Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. This report is somewhat of a refresh of Investing in Creativity, a 2006 paper from the Urban Institute authored by Dr. Maria Rosario Jackson. One of the major innovations of Jackson’s analysis was a framework that contained six structures that artists need to do their work. Validation, Demands and Markets, Material Supports, Training, Communities and Networks, and Information remain a focal point today.

Read the full post.