Steve's blog

New from the GIA Reader: Acknowledging Race in Granting to Individual Artists

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Caroline and Tony Grant of Sustainable Arts Foundation write about their efforts to examine and change its grantmaking practices with a racial equity lens. In 2016, the foundation announced its commitment to award at least half of its grants to artists of color. Read “I Once Was Blind: Acknowledging Race in Granting to Individuals.”

New from the GIA Reader: A New Literature Network

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Amy Stolls of the NEA introduces The Literary Network, or LitNet, a newly reimagined national coalition of nonprofit literary organizations aiming to support the literary field’s unique needs and challenges. Read “A New Literature Network.”

New from the GIA Reader: Of Birds and Butterflies

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, artist-in-residence Dylan Klempner reflects on the power of the arts to support medical patients and their loved ones in times of crisis. Read “Of Birds and Butterflies: On the Convergence of Arts and Health Care.”

New from the GIA Reader: Buying Time and Fanning Flames

An article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “Buying Time and Fanning Flames,” was written as a follow-up to Grantmakers in the Arts’ Funder Forum on Arts in Medicine in February 2017. Bill Cleveland, who facilitated the forum, reflects on the event and offers thoughts on the need for cross-sector collaboration to build infrastructure and program development that will further professionalize the field of arts in medicine.

GIA Podcast: Captain Sara Kass on Healing Arts in the Military

New on the GIA Podcast, Captain Sara Kass, MD, a military and medical advisor, shares her thoughts on the role of the arts in helping current military members, veterans, and their loved ones heal from emotional and physical injuries resulting from their service.

New from the GIA Reader: Funder Forum on Arts in Medicine

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Dr. Gay Hanna reports back from GIA’s Funder Forum on Arts in Medicine, where funders and thought leaders gathered to discuss how to support the growing field of artists working in clinical settings — using the healing power of art to support patient and community well-being.

Could $499,000 in Grants That Help Our Soldiers Be One Reason Congress Spared the NEA?

From Carolinia A. Miranda, writing for the Los Angeles Times:

After President Trump threatened to eliminate the [National Endowment for the Arts], Congress approved a spending bill that not only funds the NEA for another year, but increased its $148 million annual budget by nearly $2 million. Lost in much of the acrimonious debate over whether the NEA should live or die is the organization’s support for cultural programs that cater to military veterans, active duty service members and their families.
Over 50 Percent of Americans Live and Work in Suburbs. Are 50 Percent of Them Arts Leaders?

Joshua Heim, Arts Program Manager for the city of Bellevue, Washington, posts to AFTA’s Artsblog:

The lack of suburban arts leaders shouldn’t come as a surprise. From 2011-2015, Barry Hessenius published an annual list of the Fifty Most Powerful and Influential People in the Nonprofit Arts. Of the 142 individuals included on that list over the years, just three people came from suburbs. If you’re anxious about the steady decline in arts participation and interested in a fully integrated creative situation, then this is a problem. Because over half of Americans live and work in suburbs.
New from the GIA Reader: How to Invest in the Arts without Buying a Picasso

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “How to Invest in the Arts without Buying a Picasso,” Laura Callanan of Upstart Co-Lab writes about the emergence of impact investing and how it can support the creative economy.

New from the GIA Reader: Moving Dance Forward

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, author Cathy Edwards, executive director of the New England Foundation for the Arts, discusses the work of the National Dance Project. “Moving Dance Forward: Twenty Years of Grantmaking for a Changing Landscape” summarizes the results of a similarly named report and discusses the needs, trends, and demographics among dance makers and presenters.