Steve's blog

Could $499,000 in Grants That Help Our Soldiers Be One Reason Congress Spared the NEA?

From Carolinia A. Miranda, writing for the Los Angeles Times:

After President Trump threatened to eliminate the [National Endowment for the Arts], Congress approved a spending bill that not only funds the NEA for another year, but increased its $148 million annual budget by nearly $2 million. Lost in much of the acrimonious debate over whether the NEA should live or die is the organization’s support for cultural programs that cater to military veterans, active duty service members and their families.
Over 50 Percent of Americans Live and Work in Suburbs. Are 50 Percent of Them Arts Leaders?

Joshua Heim, Arts Program Manager for the city of Bellevue, Washington, posts to AFTA’s Artsblog:

The lack of suburban arts leaders shouldn’t come as a surprise. From 2011-2015, Barry Hessenius published an annual list of the Fifty Most Powerful and Influential People in the Nonprofit Arts. Of the 142 individuals included on that list over the years, just three people came from suburbs. If you’re anxious about the steady decline in arts participation and interested in a fully integrated creative situation, then this is a problem. Because over half of Americans live and work in suburbs.
New from the GIA Reader: How to Invest in the Arts without Buying a Picasso

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, “How to Invest in the Arts without Buying a Picasso,” Laura Callanan of Upstart Co-Lab writes about the emergence of impact investing and how it can support the creative economy.

New from the GIA Reader: Moving Dance Forward

In an article in the latest issue of the GIA Reader, author Cathy Edwards, executive director of the New England Foundation for the Arts, discusses the work of the National Dance Project. “Moving Dance Forward: Twenty Years of Grantmaking for a Changing Landscape” summarizes the results of a similarly named report and discusses the needs, trends, and demographics among dance makers and presenters.

New from the GIA Reader: Exploring Economic Empowerment through Cultural Revitalization

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Sonia BasSheva Mañjon writes about her work with Ohio State University to investigate economic empowerment with an arts and culture lens in order to better understand the needs in rural America. Read “From Whitesburg, Kentucky, to Washington Court House, Ohio: An Academic Explores Economic Empowerment through Cultural Revitalization.”

New from the GIA Reader: Lessons in Funder Collaboration

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Michele Kumi Baer of The New York Community Trust writes about the formation of and lessons learned from the New York City Cultural Agenda Fund, a collaborative fund focused on cultural policy and advocacy that was created in the wake of New York City’s last mayoral election. Read “Seizing Opportunity amid Uncertainty: Lessons in Funder Collaboration.”

New from the GIA Reader: Confronting Homogeneity in American Orchestras

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Jesse Rosen, president and CEO of the League of American Orchestras, discusses the League’s work addressing diversity in the orchestra field. “A New Will to Confront Homogeneity in American Orchestras,” presents the results of two of the League’s studies on the racial and gender demographics of the field and efforts to support inclusion of African American and Latino musicians through fellowships.

New from the GIA Reader: Reflections from an Art and Social Justice Funder

In the latest issue of the GIA Reader, Elizabeth Méndez Berry recounts a panel discussion of artists using the power of narrative to create social change. “Telling New Stories: Reflections from an Art and Social Justice Funder” considers how the work of arts and social justice can be expanded and encourages funders to investigate their role in this process.

New from the GIA Reader: GIA’s Annual Arts Funding Snapshot

The latest issue of the GIA Reader features our annual Arts Funding Snapshot, an overview of national arts funding by the numbers. The snapshot includes “Foundation Grants to Arts and Culture, 2014,” based on the most recent completed year of Foundation Center data, and “Government Funding for the Arts, 2016,” prepared by the National Assembly of State Art Agencies (NASAA). Findings of these two reports will be presented in our March webinar.

Most Read in 2016: What Is Civil Society?

The most-read article in the GIA Library last year, “What Is Civil Society?,” outlines the defining characteristics and necessary conditions of civil society: nonprofits, individual rights, the common good, rule of law, philanthropy, free expression, and tolerance. Written by Scholar and former GIA Board member Bruce Sievers in 2009, the article explores how these seven qualities interact within society and the democratic process. The GIA Library contains an extensive collection of articles, research reports, and other resources covering a wide variety of topics relevant to the arts and arts funding.